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Cabbage

Cabbage Fertile soils and favorable climate contribute to the impressive production of cabbage in New York State. With more than 12,000 acres grown annually, New York ranks in the top three states nationally for both fresh market and kraut cabbage. Fresh cabbage is sold in retail and wholesale markets and is used for cole slaw, egg rolls and other products. Under the proper conditions, cabbage can be stored through April, making it available nearly year round. There are two large processors in Western, NY (Seneca Foods and Great Lakes Kraut). Kraut cabbage is harvested late in the fall. It is trimmed, shredded, mixed with salt and then fermented in huge vats. The product is then packed in cans, glass jars or sealed plastic bags.

Many varieties are available for fresh market, storage and kraut cabbage. Varieties also differ in their susceptibility to insects and diseases. Cornell Cooperative Extension Educators and Cornell faculty work together annually to conduct research on many aspects of cabbage production in the state. Below you will find educational information and results of our research trials.

Relevant Event

2018 Empire State Producers EXPO

Event Offers DEC Credits

January 16 - January 18, 2018
1.25 hr sessions throughout each day
Syracuse, NY

Complete Cabbage Content

Growing for Wholesale: Grading and Packing Guidelines by Crop

Last Modified: September 25, 2017
Growing for Wholesale: Grading and Packing Guidelines by Crop

Grading and packing guidelines are now available for 16 commonly grown specialty crops in NYS: broccoli crowns, Brussels sprouts, corn, green peppers, cucumbers, green cabbage, red cabbage, savory cabbage, cauliflower, eggplant, green beans, jalapenos, poblanos, Hungarian hot peppers, summer squash, and zucchini.

Organic Production Guides

Robert Hadad, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: July 17, 2017
Organic Production Guides

Organic Production Guides for fruits, vegetables and dairy are available through the NYS Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program. They outline general practices for growing vegetable and fruit crops using organic integrated pest management techniques.

Video: Swede Midge

Last Modified: June 12, 2017
Video: Swede Midge

Swede midge is an invasive insect pest that is threatening the viability of broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, kale, kohlrabi and turnip production within the Cornell Vegetable Program region and throughout the Northeastern US. This short video will provide you with some general information about this pest and how to scout for it in your Brassicas.

Video: Flea Beetles

Last Modified: June 5, 2017
Video: Flea Beetles

Flea beetles are a common vegetable pest affecting peppers, cucurbits, sweet potato, potato, peas, beans, beets, tomato, corn, turnip, pumpkin, melon, eggplant, and others. This short video gives you some general information about this pest.

2016 Weed Research in Vegetable Crops, Cornell University

Darcy Telenko, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: January 11, 2017
2016 Weed Research in Vegetable Crops, Cornell University

Twelve weed science research plots were established at the Homer C. Thompson Vegetable Research Farm in Freeville and with on-farm collaborators. Research trials included: herbicide evaluation trials in dry bean, snap bean, lima bean, beets, carrots, peas, and sweet corn; a NYFVI support trial in collaboration with Sarah Pethybridge and Julie Kikkert on evaluation of ethofumesate rates for beets; and an industry sponsored evaluation of a new products for potential use in carrot, rosemary, rhubarb, bell pepper and broccoli.

Cold Storage Chart and Reference Guide to Commercial Vegetable Storage

Robert Hadad, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: December 13, 2016
Cold Storage Chart and Reference Guide to Commercial Vegetable Storage

Commercial vegetable growers will find a Cold Storage Chart by crop type with temperature and relative humidity recommendations. The maximum number of weeks that the crop can be held under ideal conditions is provided as well.

Adapted from the USDA Bulletin #66, The Commercial Storage of Fruits, Vegetables, and Florist and Nursery Stock, growers will find information on quality, grading, sizes, and packaging, chilling and storage, and post-harvest pathology of vegetables.

Crop Cooling and Storage

Robert Hadad, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: September 29, 2016
Crop Cooling and Storage

On-Farm Cold Storage of Fall-Harvested Fruit and Vegetable Crops is an in-depth look at the planning and designing cooling for late season and winter storage but it also is useful for general cooling as well. This was written by Scott Sanford, Distinguished Outreach Specialist, UW-Extension, and John Hendrickson, Outreach Program Manager, Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

How to Sign the Waiver for the Indemnified Dual Magnum Label

Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: May 4, 2016
How to Sign the Waiver for the Indemnified Dual Magnum Label

The DUAL MAGNUM Special Local Needs (SLN) herbicide, EPA No. 100-816/SLN No. NY-110004; a.i. metolachlor; Syngenta), label has expanded. Added Brussels sprouts (transplanted), cauliflower (transplanted), lettuce (head and leaf) and summer squash.

Note, all these uses require signing a waiver/indemnification. Instructions on how to access the waiver follow.

Video: Produce Washing Stations - How to Use a Germicidal Bleach

Last Modified: January 26, 2016
Video: Produce Washing Stations - How to Use a Germicidal Bleach

Good Agricultural Practices or GAPs are the steps taken in produce packing areas to reduce microbial contamination. One area where reducing micro contamination is critical is in the washing and cleaning of produce. This video shows you a set of standard operating procedures for using a germicidal bleach in a produce washing station. Learn what supplies are required and how to calculate the amount of germicidal bleach needed to sanitize the water.

A Peek at Nitrogen Dynamics in Cabbage: First Year Results

Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: October 27, 2015
A Peek at Nitrogen Dynamics in Cabbage: First Year Results

In 2013, the Cabbage Research and Development Program (CRDP) made nitrogen fertility one of their highest research priorities. In response, we studied nitrogen dynamics in cabbage with respect to total rate applied nitrogen and timing of application (proportion applied pre- and/or at-planting compared to side-dressed) in order to determine the appropriate use and timing of nitrogen in cabbage in order to improve efficiency, optimize rates, and reduce environmental contamination from nitrogen leaching and/or lodging in following winter wheat crop. In 2014, a small-plot trial was set up in commercial field of storage cabbage (c.v. Constellation) with five rates of total applied nitrogen (31, 66, 132, 197 and 262 lb/A) and three application timings (100:0; 50:50 and 25:75 at-planting: side-dress). To study the variability of available nitrate-nitrogen remaining in the soil at harvest of summer cabbage, a small survey was conducted. Within a period of 8 days between Aug-25 and Sep-2, nine fields of summer cabbage that were either just harvested or being harvested were sampled for available nitrate-N.

Video: New York State Produce Auctions

Last Modified: April 30, 2015
Video: New York State Produce Auctions

Currently, there are 6 produce auctions in New York State. These auctions are aggregation points that allow local farmers to sell their produce in wholesale lots to buyers from across the region. To document the economic impact of produce auctions on agriculture, local businesses, family farms, and produce buyers, the Cornell Vegetable Program worked with HarvestNY to survey top sellers and buyers.

A new Cornell Vegetable Program video shares general information about produce auctions, how buyers and sellers use the auctions to expand their businesses, and how local communities benefit from them.

2015 Cabbage Herbicide Chart

Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: April 1, 2015
2015 Cabbage Herbicide Chart

A chart with herbicides labeled for use in cabbage in New York for 2015. The relative effectiveness of each herbicide on different weed species is given.

Feasibility of Reducing Slug Damage in Cabbage

Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: March 17, 2014
Feasibility of Reducing Slug Damage in Cabbage

Slugs are an increasing threat to cabbage production: The board of the New York Cabbage Research and Development Program made slug control one of their highest research priorities for the first time in 2009. Slugs are considered a sporadic pest in cabbage and are favored by cool and moist conditions, especially where crop residues are left on the soil surface. In conventional production of cabbage, slugs tend to be a problem later in the growing season along tree lines and hedgerows and in weedy patches within the field. Slugs leave large holes in the leaves with the veins intact, and can be a contaminant in the heads when they squeeze between the leaves. During the cool wet growing season of 2009, slug contaminants were the cause of several rejected loads of cabbage in New York. It is predicted that the frequency of slug problems in cabbage will increase, because more cabbage is being grown in rotation following field corn. The newer varieties of field corn are Bt-tolerant and have tougher stalks that take longer to break down, thus, these fields have more crop residue and are more favorable for slugs. It is worthwhile to investigate whether there are cost effective means for growers to manage sporadic infestations of slugs in cabbage.

View the exciting results from our 2010 trial in the final report that follows.


Extending the Harvest Season with Fall Production

Robert Hadad, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: July 11, 2013
Extending the Harvest Season with Fall Production

Late season production starts in mid spring. For a successful crop, start with a detailed plan. Designate an area specific for late season production so that management can take place in one spot rather than all over the farm. This will make cultivation, pest management, using row cover, and harvesting more efficient to manage.


Armyworms are Poised to Eat Your Vegetable Crops

Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: June 6, 2012
Armyworms are Poised to Eat Your Vegetable Crops

They're back! Remember 2008 when armyworms marched from wheat into vegetable fields, eating everything in their path? Well, reports in western, NY are that populations of true armyworms in wheat are the highest they've been in years. True armyworms have also recently been reported in grass hay in Washington and Schenectady Cos., and in numerous crops, including sweet corn, Swiss Chard, and lettuce in Ulster/Orange Cos.

According to the NYS IPM Weekly Field Crops Report, the most common infestation sites for true armyworm larvae include dense fields of grasses, including wheat and other cereals, grassy forages, fields with rye cover crops and corn. Good grass control within and along field margins helps reduce the risk of infestations.

2005-2006 Storage Cabbage Variety Evaluation

Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: May 24, 2012
2005-2006 Storage Cabbage Variety Evaluation

Seventeen green and three red storage cabbage varieties including industry standards Amtrak, Huron and Rona, were evaluated.

2006 Kraut Cabbage Variety Evaluation

Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: May 8, 2012
2006 Kraut Cabbage Variety Evaluation

2006 Kraut Cabbage Variety Evaluation. Eighteen kraut cabbage varieties from four seed companies were evaluated for maturity, yield, plant and head characteristics and insect, disease and disorders tolerance. The final research report as well as a virtual viewing of each variety at each harvest may be viewed. Average head size and estimated marketable yield is presented in a scaled diagram. Varieties evaluated include: from Bejo: 2635, Fresco (early standard), 2658, Rotunda, Kaitlin (mid standard), 2646, Mandy, Score, Hinova and 2660; Reeds Seeds: B5-152, Superkraut 86, B5-150, Bobcat, Moreton; Seminis: Tobia, Ambrosia; Vilmorin and Puccini.

2007-2008 Storage Cabbage Variety Trial

Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: May 8, 2012
2007-2008 Storage Cabbage Variety Trial

Twenty-two storage cabbage varieties were evaluated from five seed companies.  Amtrak, Huron and Rona were used as industry standards.  Two varieties from Bejo, with black rot tolerance, were entereed for field observation only. 


2008 Kraut Cabbage Variety Trial

Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: May 8, 2012
2008 Kraut Cabbage Variety Trial

Twenty-two kraut cabbage varieties were evaluated from five seed companies. Fresco and Bobcat, Kaitlin, and Hinova were used as early, main and late industry standards, respectively.

2009-2010 Storage Cabbage Variety Evaluation

Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: May 8, 2012
2009-2010 Storage Cabbage Variety Evaluation

Seventeen storage cabbage varieties were evaluated from five seed companies. Amtrak, Huron and Rona were used as industry standards. Brutus, the variety planted in the field where the trial was hosted, was also evaluated. Seven of the submitted varieties are new, with five being numbered varieties.

View the final report and a photo summary below.

Swede Midge Website

Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: June 29, 2010
Swede Midge Website

As swede midge continues to spread to more farms and gardens across the United States, a comprehensive website is available to aid in the identification and management of this pest of cole crops.

Evaluation of Cabbage for Onion Thrips Tolerance

Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: January 26, 2010
Evaluation of Cabbage for Onion Thrips Tolerance

The objective of this study was to evaluate summer cabbage varieties for relative tolerance and susceptibility to onion thrips.

Onion Thrips Damage Among Cabbage Varieties

Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: June 10, 2009
Onion Thrips Damage Among Cabbage Varieties

Determine the relative onion thrips damage among storage and kraut cabbage varieties using this table as a gauge.

more crops
Asparagus

Asparagus

Beets

Beets

Broccoli

Broccoli

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels Sprouts

Cabbage

Cabbage

Carrots

Carrots

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

Cucumbers

Cucumbers

Dry Beans

Dry Beans

Eggplant

Eggplant

Ethnic Vegetables

Ethnic Vegetables

Garlic

Garlic

Horseradish

Horseradish

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Leeks

Leeks

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Melons

Melons

Onions

Onions

Parsnips

Parsnips

Peas

Peas

Peppers

Peppers

Potatoes

Potatoes

Pumpkins / Gourds

Pumpkins / Gourds

Radishes

Radishes

Rhubarb

Rhubarb

Rutabaga

Rutabaga

Snap Beans

Snap Beans

Squash - Summer

Squash - Summer

Squash- Winter

Squash- Winter

Sweet Corn

Sweet Corn

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Turnips

Turnips

more crops
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Upcoming Events

NY Veterans in Agriculture Summit

November 29, 2017
8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Syracuse, NY

Come gather for a day of education and networking. Learn about resources that are available to farmer veterans in New York and participate in educational sessions on topics including animal health, financial management, high tunnels, and business planning. 
view details

Second Annual Cut Flower Conference

December 1, 2017
8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Rensselaerville, NY

Cornell Cooperative Extension's Capital Area Agriculture and Horticulture Program, announces their upcoming Second Annual Cut Flower Conference. The initial Cut Flower Conference, held in 2016, was very popular with established and beginning cut flower growers and growers considering adding cut flowers to their diversified farms.
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2017 Processing Vegetable Crops Advisory Meeting

Event Offers DEC Credits

December 13, 2017
9:30 AM - 2:30 PM
Batavia, NY

All processing vegetable growers and industry members are invited to attend. Discuss the 2017 growing season and management concerns. Reports and discussion of the 2017 Projects funded by the New York Vegetable Research Council/Association. Review priorities and the role of the advisory group in applications for state and federal grants. Give your input on the format of future advisory meetings and future educational programs. 
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Announcements

Available: 2017 Certified Seed Potato Directory

The 2017 NYS Certified Seed Potato Crop Directory is now available. There is a wealth of information on NYS potato seed certification, as well as on the varieties grown for certification in 2017. The varieties include standards for processing and tablestock, newer varieties and numbered lines, and specialty/heirloom varieties. Brief summaries of the varieties' maturity, appearance, yield potential, and major disease susceptibility are included. Contact info for the growers with seed supplies of each variety is included. There is also a listing of the inspectors from the NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets in Albany and Syracuse.

Growing for Wholesale Guidelines Available

Grading and packing guidelines are now available for 16 commonly grown specialty crops in NYS: broccoli crowns, Brussels sprouts, corn, green peppers, cucumbers, green cabbage, red cabbage, savory cabbage, cauliflower, eggplant, green beans, jalapenos, poblanos, Hungarian hot peppers, summer squash, and zucchini.

Acceptable quality standards and common defects that should be sorted out on the grading line are depicted in these resources, both visually and in outline form. Find all of the grading sheets here.

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