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Pests

PestsNumerous pests affect commercial vegetable production in New York. All stages of plant growth may be susceptible to insects or disease causing pathogens which may result in poor seedling emergence, reduced yields and quality issues. Similarly, weeds compete with vegetable crops for light, nutrients and water often reducing yields. Weeds can also act as a reservoir for insects and diseases. Furthermore, weed seeds and other parts can be a contaminant of certain vegetable crops.

Cornell Vegetable Program Specialists conduct research and educational programs on many important insects, diseases and weeds in New York. While not an exhaustive list, current information on many important vegetable pests can be found below. The most recent pest content is listed below but you can find more pests under the pest categories of Diseases, Insects, and Weeds.

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    Relevant Events

    2017 Processing Vegetable Crops Advisory Meeting

    Event Offers DEC Credits

    December 13, 2017
    9:30 AM - 2:30 PM
    Batavia, NY

    2018 Empire State Producers EXPO

    Event Offers DEC Credits

    January 16 - January 18, 2018
    1.25 hr sessions throughout each day
    Syracuse, NY

    2018 Western NY Fresh Market Winter Vegetable Meeting

    Event Offers DEC Credits

    January 31, 2018
    8:00 AM registration, 8:30 AM - 3:30 PM program
    Lockport, NY

    2018 Western NY Fresh Market Winter Vegetable Meeting (Eastern location)

    Event Offers DEC Credits

    February 1, 2018
    8:00 AM registration, 8:30 AM - 3:30 PM program
    Irondequoit, NY

    Complete Pests Content

    Video: Downy Mildew

    Last Modified: July 6, 2017
    Video: Downy Mildew

    Downy mildew is a potentially devastating disease to cucurbits. It usually affects cucumbers and cantaloupes first; later in the season it can be found on summer squash and zucchini. During some seasons, downy mildew can spread to winter squash and watermelons. Growers need to be monitoring their fields. This short video shows the different stages of the disease and possible outcomes if it is not controlled.

    2017 Cucurbit Downy Mildew Management Guidelines

    Last Modified: July 5, 2017
    2017 Cucurbit Downy Mildew Management Guidelines

    From Margaret McGrath, Cornell
    Producing a high-quality cucurbit crop necessitates effectively managing downy mildew. This foliar disease is common in the northeast because the pathogen produces a large quantity of asexual spores that are easily dispersed long distances by wind, which enables it to spread widely. There has been no evidence that the pathogen is surviving between growing seasons where winter temperatures kill cucurbit crops (outdoors above the 30th latitude); however, recently both mating types have been found, albeit typically on different cucurbit crop types, thus there is the potential for the pathogen to produce oospores (sexual spores) that could enable the pathogen to survive in northern areas of the USA. The downy mildew forecasting program has documented based on downy mildew occurrence movement of the pathogen throughout the eastern USA each year via its wind-dispersed asexual spores. The pathogen does not affect fruit directly; however, affected leaves die prematurely which results in fewer fruit and/or fruit of low quality (poor flavor, sunscald, poor storability).

    The most important component of an effective management program for downy mildew is an effective, properly-timed fungicide program. And the key to that is applying mobile fungicides targeted to the pathogen starting when there is a risk of the pathogen being present. Mobile (or translaminar) fungicides are needed for control on the underside of leaves. Each year there often are changes to the fungicides recommended as the pathogen develops resistance or new products are registered. Because these fungicides have targeted activity, additional fungicides must be added to the program when there is a need to manage other diseases such as powdery mildew. Most targeted fungicides effective for downy mildew are also effective for Phytophthora blight.

    Cornell Onion Fungicide "Cheat Sheet" for Leaf Diseases, 2017

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: July 5, 2017
    Cornell Onion Fungicide

    This chart provides information on fungicides available for use in New York in 2017 in onions for control of leaf diseases including Botrytis Leaf Blight (BLB), Purple Blotch (PB), Stemphylium Leaf Blight (SLB), and Downy Mildew (DM). This year, more fungicides and detailed efficacy ratings are provided per BLB, SLB, and DM from Cornell trials. Rotation restrictions and maximum allowable per season are provided. 

    Video: Swede Midge

    Last Modified: June 12, 2017
    Video: Swede Midge

    Swede midge is an invasive insect pest that is threatening the viability of broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, kale, kohlrabi and turnip production within the Cornell Vegetable Program region and throughout the Northeastern US. This short video will provide you with some general information about this pest and how to scout for it in your Brassicas.

    Video: Flea Beetles

    Last Modified: June 5, 2017
    Video: Flea Beetles

    Flea beetles are a common vegetable pest affecting peppers, cucurbits, sweet potato, potato, peas, beans, beets, tomato, corn, turnip, pumpkin, melon, eggplant, and others. This short video gives you some general information about this pest.

    Help Us Define and Measure IPM Adoption and Practices in NY Vegetables: SURVEY

    Darcy Telenko, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: March 29, 2017
    Help Us Define and Measure IPM Adoption and Practices in NY Vegetables: SURVEY

    Darcy Telenko is coordinating the Vegetable Crop Pest Program in New York with the Integrated Pest Information Platform for Extension and Education (iPiPE) Project. As part of the program, a new set of tools is currently being developed to help you manage crop pests and increase your profitability. A survey has been developed to gather your insights to help shape the development of these tools to best support your pest management efforts. In addition, the results of the survey will help the Cornell Vegetable Program and other Extension professionals get a better picture of pest management practices among fresh market vegetable growers in New York. Take the survey now.

    2016 Weed Research in Vegetable Crops, Cornell University

    Darcy Telenko, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: January 11, 2017
    2016 Weed Research in Vegetable Crops, Cornell University

    Twelve weed science research plots were established at the Homer C. Thompson Vegetable Research Farm in Freeville and with on-farm collaborators. Research trials included: herbicide evaluation trials in dry bean, snap bean, lima bean, beets, carrots, peas, and sweet corn; a NYFVI support trial in collaboration with Sarah Pethybridge and Julie Kikkert on evaluation of ethofumesate rates for beets; and an industry sponsored evaluation of a new products for potential use in carrot, rosemary, rhubarb, bell pepper and broccoli.

    NEW! Pesticide Product Search Online

    Last Modified: November 2, 2016
    NEW! Pesticide Product Search Online

    The NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) Bureau of Pest Management has released a new pesticide product registration database. When visiting the webpage, please select the Products icon on the right side of the page to perform product searches.

    This pesticide search database is replacing the Product, Ingredient, and Manufacturer System (PIMS) product database that has been hosted by Cornell University since its inception. 

    White Rot Fact Sheet for Garlic

    Last Modified: August 31, 2016
    White Rot Fact Sheet for Garlic

    White rot is a worldwide problem in allium production, and has resurfaced in the New York garlic industry after a long period of eradication. Positive samples were collected in 2016 from the Hudson Valley, Central and Western New York, indicating that the disease is widespread. As with other soilborne diseases, white rot can be persistent and devastating. However, careful management can reduce inoculum, and because the disease is spread by seed and soil, it is also possible to prevent its spread into uninfested fields. 

    Garlic Bloat Nematode Testing Services for 2016

    Robert Hadad, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: August 8, 2016
    Garlic Bloat Nematode Testing Services for 2016

    In the wake of Dr. George Abawi's retirement and a reduction in staffing, the Bloat Nematode Testing Lab in Geneva has deferred testing to the lab at Michigan State University for the time being. Samples sent to Michigan will cost $75 dollars each. 

    Northern Corn Leaf Blight in Sweet Corn

    Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: August 8, 2016
    Northern Corn Leaf Blight in Sweet Corn

    Over the past 5 years, Northern Corn Leaf Blight (NCLB) has become a common occurrence in field and sweet corn in New York State. Researchers at Cornell University are working to determine why this disease has become more prevalent. Current hypotheses include: 1) new races of the fungus, 2) new corn hybrids may be more susceptible, 3) weather patterns that favor disease, and 4) changes in the larger cropping picture. There may be a sort of an "arms race" between new races of the fungus and new corn hybrids. Western NY has seen an increase in field corn being grown and increased disease in field corn creates additional inoculum for sweet corn in the region. If NCLB becomes severe, yields may be reduced. Fresh market sweet corn growers may also be concerned with lesions that appear on the husks, as the corn may be less marketable.

    2015 Stemphylium Leaf Blight Fungicide Trial Summary

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: July 6, 2016
    2015 Stemphylium Leaf Blight Fungicide Trial Summary

    In 2015 we learned that Stemphylium leaf blight (SLB) is everywhere and that it appears to have displaced Purple Blotch in conventional muck onion production as the main target spot disease of concern. SLB is characterized by target-spot lesions that are usually tan in color, but can also be purplish, reddish or blackish. Sometimes only a few large lesions with concentric rings occur while other times several smaller lesions occur. Regardless of lesion type, leaf dieback can be excessive which in severe cases can result in premature plant mortality (i.e. onions dying standing up).

    The Magnitude and Distribution of Western Bean Cutworm: The Risk to Dry Bean

    Carol MacNeil, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: June 13, 2016
    The Magnitude and Distribution of Western Bean Cutworm: The Risk to Dry Bean

    Western bean cutworm (WBC) is a bean and corn pest of the Western United States which has moved east, first reaching New York in 2009. It has reduced dry bean yield and quality in Michigan in past years. In 2014/15 trace levels of suspected WBC damage was found at three elevators in New York during cleaning of red kidney beans. The beans were from Livingston and Steuben Counties. Moth counts have continued to increase, reaching the threshold of concern in a number of fields in 2015. This is the first year that dry bean pods with WBC feeding damage were seen in the field. Some growers have begun to apply an insecticide just after the time of peak moth emergence.  

    Scouting for Onion Thrips

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: June 8, 2016
    Scouting for Onion Thrips

    To find the first thrips of the season, look deep into the leaf axils. The adults are brown and up to 2 mm in length, while the nymphs are yellow and 0.5 to 1.2 mm in length. Inspect 15 to 20 plants and count the total number of OT per plant and divide by the average number of leaves per plant to get the number of OT per leaf. Thrips feeding causes silvery streaking along the leaves. If you can already see thrips feeding damage that is also a good indication that it is time to spray. If there is a lot of feeding damage, than you likely missed a timely first spray.

    How to Sign the Waiver for the Indemnified Dual Magnum Label

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: May 4, 2016
    How to Sign the Waiver for the Indemnified Dual Magnum Label

    The DUAL MAGNUM Special Local Needs (SLN) herbicide, EPA No. 100-816/SLN No. NY-110004; a.i. metolachlor; Syngenta), label has expanded. Added Brussels sprouts (transplanted), cauliflower (transplanted), lettuce (head and leaf) and summer squash.

    Note, all these uses require signing a waiver/indemnification. Instructions on how to access the waiver follow.

    2015 Herbicides for Weed Control in Snap and Dry Beans

    Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: April 29, 2016
    2015 Herbicides for Weed Control in Snap and Dry Beans

    Have you had problem weeds slipping through your snap or dry bean weed control program? Have lambsquarters, ragweed, hairy or Eastern black nightshade, nutsedge, etc, been. escaping? Have you tried any of the newer materials or expanded application timings to try to improve your results? The 2015 update to the Herbicide for Snap and Dry Bean Weed Control chart will help you choose the best herbicide programs for your fields.

    Bacterial Blackleg - An Increasing Problem for Potato Growers

    Carol MacNeil, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: March 24, 2016
    Bacterial Blackleg - An Increasing Problem for Potato Growers

    Bacterial blackleg (BB), caused by Pectobacterium or Dickeya sp. (formerly called Erwinia) is not a new potato disease. It has caused occasional problems of seed decay, sprout decay, mid-season vine wilt and death, and tuber rot, for many years. A distinguishing characteristic of the disease is the inky-black color of the softening sprout or vine beginning below the soil line and spreading upward. No treatment can control the development of the disease in an infected potato plant, and there are no resistant varieties. The only control for this disease is planting blackleg-free, certified seed in a field that did not have the disease last year. 

    Pesticide Options for Pests of Potato in New York, 2016

    Last Modified: March 24, 2016
    Pesticide Options for Pests of Potato in New York, 2016

    To assist you in determining what product or products might best manage the complex of pests in your potato fields, a list of over three dozen products labeled on potato in New York have been summarized in the accompanying chart.

    2016 Beet Herbicide Chart

    Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: March 1, 2016
    2016 Beet Herbicide Chart

    This chart created in cooperation with Dr. Robin Bellinder, weed scientist at Cornell, lists the herbicides that are labeled for beets and which weed species are controlled. While the chart is a handy reference, it is critical to read the product labels thoroughly.

    Leaf Mold in High Tunnel Tomatoes 2015

    Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
    Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

    Last Modified: December 2, 2015
    Leaf Mold in High Tunnel Tomatoes 2015

    Leaf mold is a fungus disease of tomatoes that has been increasing across New York State in recent years. It is favored by high humidity and is therefore seen in greenhouse and high tunnel production but rarely in field production.

    2014 Trial Results: Stemphylium leaf blight and downy mildew in onion

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: October 6, 2015
    2014 Trial Results: Stemphylium leaf blight and downy mildew in onion

    Results summary for on-farm small-plot research trial evaluating the efficacy of over 20 fungicides for their control of Stemphylium leaf blight and downy mildew in onion.

    Priaxor: New Fungicide for Upstate NY Growers

    Last Modified: September 16, 2015
    Priaxor: New Fungicide for Upstate NY Growers

    Written by Margaret T. McGrath, Cornell:
    Priaxor is labeled for disease control and plant health in the following crops: barley, corn (all types), dried shelled peas and beans, edible-podded legume vegetables, fruiting vegetables (including tomato), oats, oilseed crops (flax seed, rapeseed, safflower, and sunflower), peanut, rye, sorghum and millet, soybean, succulent shelled peas and beans, sugar beet, sugarcane, tuberous and corm vegetable (potato), wheat and triticale. Priaxor is classified for restricted use in NY. Use is prohibited in Suffolk and Nassau counties on Long Island. REI is 12 hours. PHI is 0 days for tomato. It is as long as 21 days for some other crops.

    Strategic Management of Onion Thrips in Onions, July 2015

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: July 15, 2015
    Strategic Management of Onion Thrips in Onions, July 2015

    Following is a strategic plan for managing onion thrips in onions, which includes a strategic order of applying the different insecticides, as well as how to make critical deviations from this order based on pest pressure, relative performance of different products and time to harvest.

    Guideline Tools: Weed Management in Cucurbits, 2015

    Darcy Telenko, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: June 9, 2015
    Guideline Tools: Weed Management in Cucurbits, 2015

    This reference sheet lists the herbicides that are labeled for cucurbits in New York and which species are controlled, as well as other important considerations and photos of weeds. While this is a handy references, it is critical to read the product labels thoroughly.

    Guideline Tools: Weed Management in Peppers, 2015

    Darcy Telenko, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: June 1, 2015
    Guideline Tools: Weed Management in Peppers, 2015

    This reference sheet lists the herbicides that are labeled for peppers in New York and which species are controlled, as well as other important considerations and photos of weeds. While this is a handy references, it is critical to read the product labels thoroughly.

    Guideline Tools: Weed Management in Sweet Corn, 2015

    Darcy Telenko, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: June 1, 2015
    Guideline Tools: Weed Management in Sweet Corn, 2015

    This reference sheet lists the herbicides that are labeled for sweet corn in New York and which species are controlled, as well as other important considerations and photos of weeds. While this is a handy references, it is critical to read the product labels thoroughly.

    2015 Cabbage Herbicide Chart

    Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: April 1, 2015
    2015 Cabbage Herbicide Chart

    A chart with herbicides labeled for use in cabbage in New York for 2015. The relative effectiveness of each herbicide on different weed species is given.

    2015 Carrot Herbicide Chart

    Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: April 1, 2015
    2015 Carrot Herbicide Chart

    This chart was created in cooperation with Dr. Robin Bellinder, weed scientist at Cornell, lists the herbicides that are labeled for carrots and which weed species are controlled. While the chart is a handy reference, it is critical to read the product labels thoroughly.

    2015 Lima Bean Herbicide Chart

    Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: April 1, 2015
    2015 Lima Bean Herbicide Chart

    Baby lima beans for processing are a new crop in New York. As growers prepare to plant, they must understand the differences in herbicides for this crop compared to snap beans and dry beans. Lima beans react to some herbicides differently because they are the species Phaseolus lunatus as compared to common beans which are P. vulgaris.

    2015 Pea Herbicide Chart

    Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: April 1, 2015
    2015 Pea Herbicide Chart

    A chart is presented that lists the herbicides labelled for use on succulent peas in New York for the year 2015. The relative effectiveness of each herbicide on different weed species is highlighted.

    Living Mulch Project Update

    Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: December 22, 2014
    Living Mulch Project Update

    For several years the Cornell Vegetable Program has worked with winter grains such as rye between rows of plastic beds as a living mulch. However, rye seemed to decrease crop yield, as well as break down too early to control late season weeds. A number of studies and colleagues suggested the inclusion of clover into the system. These benefits include:
    • Late season weed control.
    • Grains provide adequate shade to allow the clover to establish and early season weed control (on its own clover will not provide early season weed control).
    • Clover as a legume can provide some of the nitrogen the grains require, potentially decreasing nutrient competition with the vegetable crop.
    • Clover may attract less lepidoteran pests than grains.
    With funding from NESARE in 2014 we established 4 living mulch treatments between rows of peppers on a cooperating farm in Penn Yan, NY. Our observations to date support the inclusion of clover in the living mulch. For example when included with both barley and rye, the clover plots had much less weed growth than the grains alone. Rye+Clover has given the best weed control, although we are noticing a trend of increased weeds in all plots as the season progresses.

    What Happened to PestMinder?

    Angela Parr, Administrative & Communications Lead
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: December 19, 2014
    What Happened to PestMinder?

    PestMinder was a weekly newsletter of the Cornell Vegetable Program for Western New York vegetable growers, industry representatives and university researchers. It was produced during the growing season and featured information on pest activity and general control recommendations, pesticide registrations, crop development information and local weather conditions.

    In 2012, the Cornell Vegetable Program decided to stop using the name ôPestMinderö for their weekly newsletter but readers can find the SAME CONTENT in VegEdge newsletter.

    Winter Aphid Management Fact Sheet

    Cordelia Machanoff, Program Aide
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: December 8, 2014
    Winter Aphid Management Fact Sheet

    Aphids can be a major problem in winter greens. This fact sheet outlines our experience with biological and biorational controls over four years of field research.

    Minimizing Deer Damage in Vegetable Crops

    Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: July 15, 2014
    Minimizing Deer Damage in Vegetable Crops

    A comprehensive plan is needed to manage deer on your farm. Understanding the biology, habitat and feeding habits is a good first step. Your management plan will depend on the size of the farm or field you wish to protect, your location, tolerance for damage and the resources you have to direct towards this project.

    Deer management fact sheets and options are provided.  

    Control of Colorado Potato Beetle & Insecticide Resistance Management

    Carol MacNeil, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: June 9, 2014
    Control of Colorado Potato Beetle & Insecticide Resistance Management

    The CPB is known for its ability to quickly develop resistance to insecticides. There are alternatives to insecticides for managing CPB, but for growers with large fields and a limited ability to rotate fields, insecticides remain key.

    2014 Potato Disease Management Strategies for Conventional & Organic Production

    Carol MacNeil, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: April 22, 2014
    2014 Potato Disease Management Strategies for Conventional & Organic Production

    This PDF from the VegMD site provides photos of common potato diseases and descriptions of risk factors. Scroll down for a table of conventional fungicides and ratings of their effectiveness against common diseases. Scroll down further for a complete list of OMRI approved organic potato fungicides for soil application, seed treatment, at planting application and foliar application, rated for effectiveness against selected diseases. Note: in both tables "Tuberborne" refers to preventing infection of tubers. Always check with your organic certifier before using any material. The last table lists many potato varieties and their susceptibility against many diseases, as well as other attributes.

    2014 Potato Fungicide Roster and Ratings with Emphasis on Late Blight Control

    Carol MacNeil, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: April 22, 2014
    2014 Potato Fungicide Roster and Ratings with Emphasis on Late Blight Control

    The 2014 roster and ranking chart of potato fungicides with specific emphasis on control of late blight. Note that in 2014, Presidio use on potato is NOT allowed. This is a loss for potato growers since Presidio performed so well for the tuber blight phase of late blight. Notes for foliar blight and tuber blight protection are included as well.

    2014 Tomato Disease Management Strategies

    Carol MacNeil, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: April 22, 2014
    2014 Tomato Disease Management Strategies

    Disease Management Strategies for Conventional, Organic and Home Garden Production:
    This PDF from the VegMD site provides photos of common tomato diseases and descriptions of risk factors. Scroll down for a table of conventional and OMRI-approved fungicides and ratings of their effectiveness against common diseases. Always check with your organic certifier before using any material. Scroll down for a table of Outstanding Tomato Varieties for the Northeast, with brief descriptions of the varieties, notes on resistance to late blight, early blight and Septoria leaf spot, and seed sources.

    Fall Chemical Burn Down of Perennial Sow Thistle in Onions, 2013 Trial Results

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: March 25, 2014
    Fall Chemical Burn Down of Perennial Sow Thistle in Onions, 2013 Trial Results

    Perennial sow thistle has increased in economic importance and has become a serious weed problem for muck onion growers in the Western region on New York. In this project, we investigated fall chemical burn down strategies to manage this weed, as well as the use of a synthetic auxin growth regulator type herbicide, trade name Stinger to manage this weed in-season within an onion crop. Crop tolerance to Stinger was also studied. 

    Following is the first of three reports from 2013 Trials: Report No. 1. Simulated Fall Chemical Burn Down of Perennial Sow Thistle

    In-Season Management of Perennial Sow Thistle in Onions, 2013 Trial Results

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: March 25, 2014
    In-Season Management of Perennial Sow Thistle in Onions, 2013 Trial Results

    Perennial sow thistle has increased in economic importance and has become a serious weed problem for muck onion growers in the Western region on New York. In this project, we investigated fall chemical burn down strategies to manage this weed, as well as the use of a synthetic auxin growth regulator type herbicide, trade name Stinger to manage this weed in-season within an onion crop. Crop tolerance to Stinger was also studied.

    Following is the FINAL report and the first of 3 complimentary power point presentation files.

    In-Season Management of Perennial Sow Thistle, 2013 Results (Part II)

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: March 25, 2014
    In-Season Management of Perennial Sow Thistle, 2013 Results (Part II)

    Perennial sow thistle has increased in economic importance and has become a serious weed problem for muck onion growers in the Western region on New York. In this project, we investigated fall chemical burn down strategies to manage this weed, as well as the use of a synthetic auxin growth regulator type herbicide, trade name Stinger to manage this weed in-season within an onion crop. Crop tolerance to Stinger was also studied.

    Following are the second and third parts of the complimentary power point presentation.

    Onion Crop Tolerance to Stinger (a.i. clopyralid)

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: March 25, 2014
    Onion Crop Tolerance to Stinger (a.i. clopyralid)

    Perennial sow thistle has increased in economic importance and has become a serious weed problem for muck onion growers in the Western region on New York. In this project, we investigated fall chemical burn down strategies to manage this weed, as well as the use of a synthetic auxin growth regulator type herbicide, trade name Stinger to manage this weed in-season within an onion crop. Crop tolerance to Stinger was also studied.

    Following is the final report:
    Report No. 3: Onion Crop Tolerance to Stinger (a.i. clopyralid)

    Feasibility of Reducing Slug Damage in Cabbage

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: March 17, 2014
    Feasibility of Reducing Slug Damage in Cabbage

    Slugs are an increasing threat to cabbage production: The board of the New York Cabbage Research and Development Program made slug control one of their highest research priorities for the first time in 2009. Slugs are considered a sporadic pest in cabbage and are favored by cool and moist conditions, especially where crop residues are left on the soil surface. In conventional production of cabbage, slugs tend to be a problem later in the growing season along tree lines and hedgerows and in weedy patches within the field. Slugs leave large holes in the leaves with the veins intact, and can be a contaminant in the heads when they squeeze between the leaves. During the cool wet growing season of 2009, slug contaminants were the cause of several rejected loads of cabbage in New York. It is predicted that the frequency of slug problems in cabbage will increase, because more cabbage is being grown in rotation following field corn. The newer varieties of field corn are Bt-tolerant and have tougher stalks that take longer to break down, thus, these fields have more crop residue and are more favorable for slugs. It is worthwhile to investigate whether there are cost effective means for growers to manage sporadic infestations of slugs in cabbage.

    View the exciting results from our 2010 trial in the final report that follows.


    Relative Performance of Onion Fungicides

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: March 17, 2014
    Relative Performance of Onion Fungicides

    Botrytis leaf blight (BLB) and purple blotch (PB) are two of the most common and important leaf diseases of onions in New York. BLB is favored by cool and wet conditions, optimum: 59-65 degrees F + 12 hours leaf wetness, infection greatly reduced above 81 degrees F. PB is favored by warmer and humid conditions, optimum: 77 degrees F + 90% RH, minimum 55 degrees F; maximum 97 degrees F. Several fungicides are labeled in New York for control of both of these diseases.

    To determine which fungicides were best for controlling BLB and PB in New York, head to head comparisons of the different fungicides were evaluated in four on-farm small plot trials, in Elba (2006), Sodus in (2007), Pembroke (2008) and Linwood (2008). Seven to eight weekly fungicide sprays were made per season starting in mid- to late-June using a back pack sprayer. Quantitative evaluations were made including number of BLB and PB lesions per plant, % leaf dieback, plant health ratings, yield and grade.

    Diagnosis and Management of Potato Tuber Diseases

    Carol MacNeil, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: December 19, 2013
    Diagnosis and Management of Potato Tuber Diseases

    A seven page color fact sheet on the Diagnosis and Management of Potato Storage Diseases is now available online from the University of Idaho. The diseases covered are those which NYS potato growers often find themselves dealing with: pink rot, Pythium leak, late blight, Fusarium dry rot, bacterial soft rot, silver scurf, black dot, and early blight. In addition to assisting with the proper identification of the diseases, there is information on sanitation of equipment and the storage, and recommendations on how to hold lots with some disease if you can't sell them immediately. 

    Grafting Tomatoes Video: The Motivation and Benefits of Grafting

    Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: October 16, 2013
    Grafting Tomatoes Video: The Motivation and Benefits of Grafting

    As soil based production of tomatoes continues in tunnels and greenhouses, risk of root-zone diseases, insects and nutrient imbalances increase. Grafting, the combination of two separate cultivars into one plant, is one management approach to these challenges. Learn more about the motivations and benefits of grafting tomatoes in this video of Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist for the Cornell Vegetable Program.

    How to Graft Tomatoes: An Instructional Video and Factsheet

    Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: October 16, 2013
    How to Graft Tomatoes: An Instructional Video and Factsheet

    Grafting can significantly increase tomato yields and increase plant resistance to soil-borne diseases. Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist with the Cornell Vegetable Program has developed a step-by-step tutorial for growers on how to graft tomatoes. 

    Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) in Tomatoes

    Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: September 23, 2013
    Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) in Tomatoes

    Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) has gained notoriety for its impact on berry crops. We are including an update here as it has also been documented to infest tomatoes.

    As a brief recap, SWD is a new invasive fruit fly with the unique ability to lay eggs in unripe fruit. The eggs and larvae become crop contaminants, unfortunately often not apparent until post-harvest and sometimes post-sale. So far in 2013 SWD has been confirmed in the Hudson Valley (Ulster and Orange Counties); Northern New York (St. Lawrence Co.), Long Island (Suffolk Co.) and the Finger Lakes (Ontario Co.). These specimens were all caught in traps near berry plantings. From the wide range of geography and macro-climates of these confirmed findings we can infer that SWD is present throughout NYS. Read more to learn how much of a threat SWD is to tomato growers.

    Determining Late Blight Sensitivity to Ridomil Takes Time

    Carol MacNeil, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: September 19, 2013
    Determining Late Blight Sensitivity to Ridomil Takes Time

    The % LB diseased foliage in a field significantly affects how well any fungicide works against it. On September 16, 2013, Bill Fry, Cornell said, "Years ago we did experiments on the effect of timing of Ridomil on the suppression of LB [on a sensitive LB strain]. The treatments included metalaxyl/Ridomil, mancozeb, or no fungicide. We initiated applications at ~0.5% disease or at 2-5% diseased [foliage]. The effects of Ridomil were apparent within a day or two, but the effects of mancozeb were not visible for at least one week. LB increased explosively in the mancozeb and untreated plots for the first week. Subsequently, mancozeb did slightly suppress disease relative to the water control. The effect of Ridomil was dramatically different with an immediate observable effect in [reducing disease development]. Nonetheless, the amount of disease in the Ridomil plots continued to increase gradually for the next four weeks. When we initiated Ridomil applications at 0.5% disease the final level of disease was less, and the rate at which disease increased was less, than when we began at 2-5% diseased foliage. There was inoculum from other plots that probably contributed to increased LB. Thus, once disease is established, it's really difficult to totally stop this pathogen. I suspect that given the wet weather and favorable conditions we've had recently, any fungicide may have been challenged."

    Copper Fungicides for Organic Disease Management in Vegetables

    Last Modified: September 16, 2013
    Copper Fungicides for Organic Disease Management in Vegetables

    There are several different copper fungicides approved for use in organically-produced crops. Copper fungicides are important tools for managing diseases that cannot be effectively managed with cultural practices alone.

    Application Equipment for Potato Post-Harvest Disease Control

    Carol MacNeil, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: September 13, 2013
    Application Equipment for Potato Post-Harvest Disease Control

    Late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary, and pink rot, caused by Phytophthora erythroseptica Pethybr., are two devastating potato tuber diseases. These pathogens regularly cause storage losses in potato production systems. While these pathogens, especially P. infestans, spread rapidly in the field, there can also be substantial tuber-to-tuber spread during mechanical harvesting and tuber transfer procedures. With these diseases present in the field, storage losses well beyond what would be expected can occur based on the pathogen level in the field. Learn more about how to control diseases following potato harvest in this University of Maine Extension publication.

    2013 Tomato, Eggplant, and Pepper Fungicide Roster for NYS

    Carol MacNeil, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: July 16, 2013

    An overview of tomato, eggplant, and pepper fungicide roster.

    Late Blight Sample Collection and Submission to Bill Fry, Cornell

    Carol MacNeil, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: July 16, 2013
    Late Blight Sample Collection and Submission to Bill Fry, Cornell

    If late blight is detected or suspected on your farm, and you cannot get a sample to a Cornell Vegetable Program staff member in a day or two, you should submit your sample to Bill Fry's lab at Cornell. Instructions for reporting and sampling are provided.

    How Copper Sprays Work and Avoiding Phytotoxicity

    Last Modified: June 26, 2013
    How Copper Sprays Work and Avoiding Phytotoxicity

    Copper has been widely used in both conventional and organic production for some time. Copper was one of the first elements used as a plant fungicide (the other was Sulfur). Its discovery can be traced back to the famous origin of Bordeaux mixture, containing a mixture of copper sulfate (CuSO4) and slaked lime, and used for downy mildew control in French vineyards. 

    Identifying Ground Beetles

    Last Modified: June 26, 2013
    Identifying Ground Beetles

    It's an easy error to make. You notice some plants being chewed. You look around for clues and spot a good sized hole in the soil nearby. If you poke around in the soil you may unearth a surprisingly large, aggressive-looking beetle and it's easy to conclude that you've found your culprit. But you would be wrong.

    Spinich Leafminer- Identification and Management

    Last Modified: June 26, 2013
    Spinich Leafminer- Identification and Management

    The spinach leafminer (Pegomya hyoscyami) is a common pest that causes unsightly leaf blisters and necrosis of spinach, beets, chards and host weeds like lambsquaters, nightshade, chickweed and plantain. Marketability of the leaf crops is significantly impacted. This is the case for beet greens and bunched beets.

    Role of Adjuvants in Bacterial Diseases of Onions

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: February 26, 2013
    Role of Adjuvants in Bacterial Diseases of Onions

    Bacterial diseases of onions have become an increasing threat to the sustainability of the New York onion industry with losses of 40% or more occurring in some lots in some years. Recently, a New York onion grower suggested that the penetrating surfactants that Cornell entomologists strongly recommend to improve efficacy of insecticides for onion thrips control might be allowing for easy entry of bacterial pathogens into the leaves, thus increasing incidence of bacterial bulb decay.  In this study we applied adjuvants LI700, MSO, Kinetic, Dyne-Amic and HiWett in combination with bacterial pathogens of onions to onion plants to see if higher levels of bacterial bulb decay resulted with adjuvants compared to water plus bacteria.  Preliminary results indicated that a single application of adjuvant plus bacterial had no effect on bacterial bulb decay.  The effect of multiple applications of adjuvants on bacterial bulb decay warrants further research.

    Spring Application of Winter Rye Grain for Weed Control in Summer Vegetables

    Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: January 22, 2013
    Spring Application of Winter Rye Grain for Weed Control in Summer Vegetables

    Plasticulture production of vegetables has been widely adopted in the Northeast providing farmers with in-row weed control, soil moisture regulation and season extension. However, the bare row middles in this system require herbicide or cultivation which increase environmental impacts; impairing water quality, decreasing soil organic matter levels and increasing labor inputs. In 2012 the Cornell Vegetable Program was awarded a NESARE grant to evaluate a new use of cover crops, by sowing winter rye between plastic-mulched beds of tomatoes and onions on two cooperating farms. Both farms provided cultivation and herbicide treatments to enable us to compare weed control, yield and pest and disease impacts.

    Zero Disease Tolerance in High Tunnels

    Last Modified: January 10, 2013
    Zero Disease Tolerance in High Tunnels

    Printed in American Vegetable Grower, October 5, 2012:
    Keeping crops free of disease is the goal of all growers, including those producing in high tunnels. Download the PDF file to learn about 20 practices that will reduce the chances of pathogens taking over when growing under cover.

    Exploring the Relationship Between Nitrogen, Plant Spacing and Bacterial Disease

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: January 8, 2013
    Exploring the Relationship Between Nitrogen, Plant Spacing and Bacterial Disease

    It is important to emphasize that "exploring" is in the present tense. In New York, we are just beginning to delve into the fascinating relationship between nitrogen, plant spacing and bacterial diseases of onions. Our preliminary results suggest that reduced soil nitrogen and tighter plant spacing results in less bacterial decay. In this article, we report preliminary findings from exploratory studies and the observations that lead to these trials. We stress that we are not making recommendations at this time. However, we are hopeful that further studies will lead to specific recommendations.

    Spotted Wing Drosophila in Tomatoes

    Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: September 13, 2012
    Spotted Wing Drosophila in Tomatoes

    Although this new pest in gaining attention from berry growers, it is also a threat to tomatoes.  Spotted wing Drosophila (SWD) lays eggs in ripe or maturing fruit with a rear-end that favors a miniature hack-saw. The eggs, which have creepy breathing tubes, hatch out into nasty worms that feed inside the fruit creating a liquefied mass. Reports on tomatoes mention organic, heirloom and high tunnel crops. A common theme to these observations is that insecticides are generally absent. SWD has been reported in 2012 throughout the state, so far in traps and fruit plantings (see map courtesy of Hudson Valley Fruit Program). Likely there are unreported cases of infested tomatoes. 

    O-zone Injury on Vegetables

    Crystal Stewart, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

    Last Modified: August 22, 2012
    O-zone Injury on Vegetables

    Hot, humid weather with stagnant air masses may lead to ozone damage on crops. Ozone warnings were recently issued for much of New York. These warnings are intended for people with respiratory problems and let them know they should limit their outdoor activity and try to stay as much as possible in air-conditioned locations. These warning are also a good indicator that ozone damage may occur in plants.

    Managing Phytophthora Blight in 2012

    Last Modified: August 7, 2012

    Phytophthora blight was more severe in 2011 than it has been for many years, which raises concern that 2012 could be another bad year for this very destructive disease because of the quantity of pathogen spores left in fields at the end of last season to survive over winter. Blight was severe in areas where there were intensive rainfall events, which created unusually favorable conditions. A key to successfully managing this disease is managing soil moisture to avoid saturated conditions that favor pathogen development and infection. Achieving this is difficult when rainfall amounts are large. Another key has been fungicides registered recently with targeted activity for pathogens in this biological group (Oomycetes). Rain events in 2011 challenged maintaining a good spray schedule and thus achieving effective control. Once blight starts to develop in a crop, it can be difficult to stop, thus a management program will be most successful when initiated before symptoms begin to develop. This includes fungicide applications. An integrated program with cultural practices and fungicides is considered essential.

    Managing Weeds in Carrot Fields

    Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: June 21, 2012
    Managing Weeds in Carrot Fields

    Tips on how to manage weeds in carrots, including special problems like swamp dodder


    Armyworms are Poised to Eat Your Vegetable Crops

    Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: June 6, 2012
    Armyworms are Poised to Eat Your Vegetable Crops

    They're back! Remember 2008 when armyworms marched from wheat into vegetable fields, eating everything in their path? Well, reports in western, NY are that populations of true armyworms in wheat are the highest they've been in years. True armyworms have also recently been reported in grass hay in Washington and Schenectady Cos., and in numerous crops, including sweet corn, Swiss Chard, and lettuce in Ulster/Orange Cos.

    According to the NYS IPM Weekly Field Crops Report, the most common infestation sites for true armyworm larvae include dense fields of grasses, including wheat and other cereals, grassy forages, fields with rye cover crops and corn. Good grass control within and along field margins helps reduce the risk of infestations.

    2005-2006 Storage Cabbage Variety Evaluation

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: May 24, 2012
    2005-2006 Storage Cabbage Variety Evaluation

    Seventeen green and three red storage cabbage varieties including industry standards Amtrak, Huron and Rona, were evaluated.

    Garlic Weed Control

    Crystal Stewart, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

    Last Modified: May 24, 2012
    Garlic Weed Control

    View the following document for the latest information for weed control in garlic, in both organic and conventional practices. 

    Leek Moth Control and Information

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: May 24, 2012
    Leek Moth Control and Information

    Leek Moth was detected in four home gardens in Plattsburg, NY in 2009. It was first detected in Ontario, Canada in 1997 where it has become problematic especially to small-scale, organic growers in eastern Ontario and to commercial producers in western Quebec, who have limited insecticides available to them.

    Leek Moth continues its spread to more farms and gardens across the U.S., a new comprehensive website is available to aid in the identification and management of this pest. This Cornell website features maps of the distribution of leek moth, protocols on insect monitoring and identification, best management practices for farms and home gardens, a photo gallery of damage symptoms and a comprehensive resource section.

    Visit the Leek Moth website.


    Seed Treatments for Onion Maggot Control in Onions

    Last Modified: May 24, 2012
    Seed Treatments for Onion Maggot Control in Onions

    New York onion growers FINALLY have not one, but TWO new seed treatment options for control of onion maggot. Sepresto® was first introduced for the 2011 growing season, but is available only on Nunhem's onion varieties. Also available for the 2012 growing season on all onion varieties is Farmore® FI500. Both of these insecticide seed treatments are only available in packages that also include fungicides. Altogether, NY onion growers now have FIVE insecticides (counting diazinon), labeled for onion maggot control. Of these, 3 are seed treatments; decisions for which one to use must be made when seed orders are placed. In making these decisions, it is important to know the relative efficacy of the insecticides, what diseases the fungicides in the seed treatment packages control and how to extend the useful life of these precious new insecticides. The information that follows addresses these questions and should assist you in making a decision on how to control maggots as well as early season seedling diseases.

    2006 Kraut Cabbage Variety Evaluation

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: May 8, 2012
    2006 Kraut Cabbage Variety Evaluation

    2006 Kraut Cabbage Variety Evaluation. Eighteen kraut cabbage varieties from four seed companies were evaluated for maturity, yield, plant and head characteristics and insect, disease and disorders tolerance. The final research report as well as a virtual viewing of each variety at each harvest may be viewed. Average head size and estimated marketable yield is presented in a scaled diagram. Varieties evaluated include: from Bejo: 2635, Fresco (early standard), 2658, Rotunda, Kaitlin (mid standard), 2646, Mandy, Score, Hinova and 2660; Reeds Seeds: B5-152, Superkraut 86, B5-150, Bobcat, Moreton; Seminis: Tobia, Ambrosia; Vilmorin and Puccini.

    2007-2008 Storage Cabbage Variety Trial

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: May 8, 2012
    2007-2008 Storage Cabbage Variety Trial

    Twenty-two storage cabbage varieties were evaluated from five seed companies.  Amtrak, Huron and Rona were used as industry standards.  Two varieties from Bejo, with black rot tolerance, were entereed for field observation only. 


    2008 Kraut Cabbage Variety Trial

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: May 8, 2012
    2008 Kraut Cabbage Variety Trial

    Twenty-two kraut cabbage varieties were evaluated from five seed companies. Fresco and Bobcat, Kaitlin, and Hinova were used as early, main and late industry standards, respectively.

    2009-2010 Storage Cabbage Variety Evaluation

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: May 8, 2012
    2009-2010 Storage Cabbage Variety Evaluation

    Seventeen storage cabbage varieties were evaluated from five seed companies. Amtrak, Huron and Rona were used as industry standards. Brutus, the variety planted in the field where the trial was hosted, was also evaluated. Seven of the submitted varieties are new, with five being numbered varieties.

    View the final report and a photo summary below.

    2011 Pumpkin Herbicide Trial

    Chuck Bornt, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

    Last Modified: April 2, 2012
    2011  Pumpkin Herbicide Trial

    The Capital District Vegetable & Small Fruit Program evaluated current herbicides and one un-labeled herbicide for pumpkins. Weed control ratings and the cost associated with each prodcut can be found in the the full pdf. 

    Greenhouse Cucumber Variety Trial (2011)

    Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: April 2, 2012
    Greenhouse Cucumber Variety Trial (2011)

    The unheated greenhouse, or high tunnel, offers a vertical production environment suitable for crops such as indeterminate tomatoes and cucumbers. As it is a soil based system however, and passively heated, greenhouse cucumbers must be transplanted later in the spring than tomatoes, due to their intolerance for low root zone temperatures. However, cucumbers can provide good returns when grown in a high tunnel, given consistent pest control and matching variety performance with market demand. A variety trial of four greenhouse cucumbers was established in a cooperating high tunnel in the spring of 2011.

    High Tunnel Tomato Trial 2011 (determinate varieties)

    Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: April 2, 2012
    High Tunnel Tomato Trial 2011 (determinate varieties)

    High tunnel tomatoes continue to grow in popularity with New York vegetable growers for disease control, earliness and fruit quality. Variety selection is one of the most important management decisions for tunnels. The decision between determinate and indeterminate varieties depends on grower preference and market demand. Total yield must be balanced with fruit quality and disease resistance

    Stop the Rot! - Using Cultural Practices to Manage Bacterial Diseases of Onion

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: April 2, 2012
    Stop the Rot! - Using Cultural Practices to Manage Bacterial Diseases of Onion

    Narrow plant spacing reduced bacterial bulb decay by 53 to 64%
    Do you know how easy this is? A simple modification to adjust your planting configuration is all it would take to drastically reduce losses from bacterial bulb decay. Our studies showed that when plant spacing was reduced from 6 or 8 inches to 4 inches with 3 or 4 rows per 3-foot plastic mulch bed (row spacing: 4 rows = 6 inch; 3 rows = 8 inch), this provided 53 to 64% control of bacterial bulb decay at harvest (Table 1). Marketable yield also increased by 1.4 to 2.4 times, representing an increased net economic return of $43 to $258 per 100 feet of bed, due to increased weight of marketable jumbo-sized bulbs (Table 1). We learned that wide plant spacing produces big bushy plants with more leaves, thicker necks, delayed maturity and bigger bulbs. Unfortunately, it was these bigger bulbs that rotted! By narrowing plant spacing, we got fewer colossal-sized bulbs, which we more than made up for by having significantly more healthy jumbo-sized bulbs to market (Table 1).

    Alternatives to black plastic reduced bacterial bulb decay by 59 to 75%
    This is also a very simple and easy modification for small-scale growers producing onions on plastic mulch to make to their cultural practices that could go a very long way towards reducing bacterial bulb decay. Our studies showed that reflective silver mulch, biodegradable black plastic and bare ground had significantly 1.8 to 2.8 times higher marketable yield than black plastic (Table 2). Reflective silver and biodegradable black plastics had significantly 3.7 and 3.6 times, respectively, higher jumbo weight than black plastic, which resulted in an increased net return of $96 to $215 per 100 feet of bed compared to black plastic (Table 2). All of the alternatives to black plastic had significantly lower soil temperatures compared to the black plastic; we suspect that the higher temperatures of the black plastic are more favorable for development of bacterial diseases.


    What's Bugging You? Pest Presentation from 2012 Garlic School

    Robert Hadad, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: April 2, 2012
    What's Bugging You? Pest Presentation from 2012 Garlic School

    This presentation was given at the Western NY location of the Cornell Vegetable Program and Cornell Capital District Vegetable Program 2012 Garlic School. This presentation covered insect pests of garlic.

    Resource Guide for Organic Insect and Disease Management

    Robert Hadad, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: April 1, 2012
    Resource Guide for Organic Insect and Disease Management

    Organic farmers rely primarily on preventive, cultural and integrated methods of pest and disease management. However, there are a number of materials available for use that can complement and support organic management. This guide was developed to provide a useful and scientifically accurate reference for organic farmers and agricultural professionals searching for information on best practices, available materials and perhaps most importantly, the efficacy of materials that are permitted for use in organic systems.

    Nightshade Management Reduces Crop Loss

    Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: March 20, 2012
    Nightshade Management Reduces Crop Loss

    Depending on the crop, nightshade can reduce crop yields, harbor diseases, and cause crops to be rejected by processors. Learn about the species of nightshades in NY, physiological differences between them, emergence and growth information, and control strategies.

    Wild Proso Millet

    Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: March 20, 2012
    Wild Proso Millet

    Wild proso millet is present in NY and can be a problem weed in sweet corn and other vegetable crops. Learn how to identify this weed on your farm.

    Buckwheat Strips to Attract Beneficial Insects in Potato Production

    Robert Hadad, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: January 12, 2012
    Buckwheat Strips to Attract Beneficial Insects in Potato Production

    Download a report of field plot strategies for using buckwheat strips to attract beneficial insects for the control of Colorado potato beetle in potato production (2009/2010). This project was funded by the Organic Farming Research Federation.

    Fall Application of Dual Magnum for Yellow Nutsedge Control in Muck Onions

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: September 14, 2011
    Fall Application of Dual Magnum for Yellow Nutsedge Control in Muck Onions

    Yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L.) pressure is very high in certain muck areas where onions are grown. It appears to have become more of a problem in recent years. Onion growers and chemical company representatives believe that applying Dual Magnum, active ingredient metalochlor, in the fall can significantly reduce nutsedge pressure the following spring. However, weed scientists across the country do not believe that fall applications of metalochlor would have any effect on nutsedge populations the following spring, because the dissipation of metolachlor, is relatively rapid, 4-7 weeks in the northern United States. Dual Magnum is labeled as a fall application in field corn and soybeans only in Iowa, Minnesota, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin. For this use, there are restrictions on the label that state the date after which Dual Magnum may be applied, that soil temperature in the top 4 inches must consistently be 55°F and lower, and that tillage following incorporation must not exceed the 2-3 inch depth of incorporation.

    Phytophthora Blight on Beans

    Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: July 13, 2010
    Phytophthora Blight on Beans

    Phytophthora blight is a devastating disease caused by the water mold Phytophthora capsici. It is well-known throughout the United States as a pathogen on solanaceous and cucurbit crops, and in recent years has caused problems on snap and lima beans.

    Swede Midge Website

    Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: June 29, 2010
    Swede Midge Website

    As swede midge continues to spread to more farms and gardens across the United States, a comprehensive website is available to aid in the identification and management of this pest of cole crops.

    Evaluation of Cabbage for Onion Thrips Tolerance

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: January 26, 2010
    Evaluation of Cabbage for Onion Thrips Tolerance

    The objective of this study was to evaluate summer cabbage varieties for relative tolerance and susceptibility to onion thrips.

    Onion Thrips Damage Among Cabbage Varieties

    Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
    Cornell Vegetable Program

    Last Modified: June 10, 2009
    Onion Thrips Damage Among Cabbage Varieties

    Determine the relative onion thrips damage among storage and kraut cabbage varieties using this table as a gauge.

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    Upcoming Events

    NY Veterans in Agriculture Summit

    November 29, 2017
    8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
    Syracuse, NY

    Come gather for a day of education and networking. Learn about resources that are available to farmer veterans in New York and participate in educational sessions on topics including animal health, financial management, high tunnels, and business planning. 
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    Second Annual Cut Flower Conference

    December 1, 2017
    8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    Rensselaerville, NY

    Cornell Cooperative Extension's Capital Area Agriculture and Horticulture Program, announces their upcoming Second Annual Cut Flower Conference. The initial Cut Flower Conference, held in 2016, was very popular with established and beginning cut flower growers and growers considering adding cut flowers to their diversified farms.
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    2017 Processing Vegetable Crops Advisory Meeting

    Event Offers DEC Credits

    December 13, 2017
    9:30 AM - 2:30 PM
    Batavia, NY

    All processing vegetable growers and industry members are invited to attend. Discuss the 2017 growing season and management concerns. Reports and discussion of the 2017 Projects funded by the New York Vegetable Research Council/Association. Review priorities and the role of the advisory group in applications for state and federal grants. Give your input on the format of future advisory meetings and future educational programs. 
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    Announcements

    Available: 2017 Certified Seed Potato Directory

    The 2017 NYS Certified Seed Potato Crop Directory is now available. There is a wealth of information on NYS potato seed certification, as well as on the varieties grown for certification in 2017. The varieties include standards for processing and tablestock, newer varieties and numbered lines, and specialty/heirloom varieties. Brief summaries of the varieties' maturity, appearance, yield potential, and major disease susceptibility are included. Contact info for the growers with seed supplies of each variety is included. There is also a listing of the inspectors from the NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets in Albany and Syracuse.

    Growing for Wholesale Guidelines Available

    Grading and packing guidelines are now available for 16 commonly grown specialty crops in NYS: broccoli crowns, Brussels sprouts, corn, green peppers, cucumbers, green cabbage, red cabbage, savory cabbage, cauliflower, eggplant, green beans, jalapenos, poblanos, Hungarian hot peppers, summer squash, and zucchini.

    Acceptable quality standards and common defects that should be sorted out on the grading line are depicted in these resources, both visually and in outline form. Find all of the grading sheets here.

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