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Dry Beans

Dry Beans Dry edible beans are grown almost exclusively in Western NY (such as Genesee, Livingston, Monroe and Wyoming counties) and in Central NY (such as Ontario, Yates, Seneca and Cayuga counties), where soils are deep, fertile and light- to medium-textured. New York produces edible dry beans on up to 16,000 acres for local, regional (east of the Mississippi), export and organic markets. Those beans marketed regionally are either processed into canned product or packaged for the dry pack market. Value of the crop in the state varies but has averaged around $7 million/year recently.

Major types include varieties of black turtle soup and light/dark red kidney beans. Adoption of reduced, zone tillage has been occurring on a number of farms as a time and fuel-savings measure. Insect, disease and weed pests are similar to those seen on snap beans and are managed similarly. Because dry beans must mature on the plant they are out in the field much longer than snap beans, however, so there is more opportunity for diseases such as white mold to develop. Weeds must also be controlled for a much longer period.

Most Recent Dry Beans Content

2016 Weed Research in Vegetable Crops, Cornell University

Darcy Telenko, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: January 11, 2017
2016 Weed Research in Vegetable Crops, Cornell University

Twelve weed science research plots were established at the Homer C. Thompson Vegetable Research Farm in Freeville and with on-farm collaborators. Research trials included: herbicide evaluation trials in dry bean, snap bean, lima bean, beets, carrots, peas, and sweet corn; a NYFVI support trial in collaboration with Sarah Pethybridge and Julie Kikkert on evaluation of ethofumesate rates for beets; and an industry sponsored evaluation of a new products for potential use in carrot, rosemary, rhubarb, bell pepper and broccoli.

The Magnitude and Distribution of Western Bean Cutworm: The Risk to Dry Bean

Carol MacNeil, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: June 13, 2016
The Magnitude and Distribution of Western Bean Cutworm: The Risk to Dry Bean

Western bean cutworm (WBC) is a bean and corn pest of the Western United States which has moved east, first reaching New York in 2009. It has reduced dry bean yield and quality in Michigan in past years. In 2014/15 trace levels of suspected WBC damage was found at three elevators in New York during cleaning of red kidney beans. The beans were from Livingston and Steuben Counties. Moth counts have continued to increase, reaching the threshold of concern in a number of fields in 2015. This is the first year that dry bean pods with WBC feeding damage were seen in the field. Some growers have begun to apply an insecticide just after the time of peak moth emergence.  

2015 Herbicides for Weed Control in Snap and Dry Beans

Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: April 29, 2016
2015 Herbicides for Weed Control in Snap and Dry Beans

Have you had problem weeds slipping through your snap or dry bean weed control program? Have lambsquarters, ragweed, hairy or Eastern black nightshade, nutsedge, etc, been. escaping? Have you tried any of the newer materials or expanded application timings to try to improve your results? The 2015 update to the Herbicide for Snap and Dry Bean Weed Control chart will help you choose the best herbicide programs for your fields.


More Dry Beans Content

Priaxor: New Fungicide for Upstate NY Growers
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Upcoming Events

Women in Agriculture Discussion Group: Apples and Vegetables

September 30, 2019
Monday, 6:00 - 7:30 PM
Lockport, NY

Each monthly Women in Ag discussion group meeting will feature an established, innovative Farm-her leading the group on a tour of her operation and sharing her expertise on business management and production. Several guest speakers, as well as Cornell Vegetable Program staff, will be brought in to act as resource people for developing solutions to common production challenges.

The September 30 meeting will cover season extension, managing CSAs and tarping led by Liz Tee, CCE Lake Ontario Fruit Program, and Elizabeth Buck, CCE Cornell Vegetable Program. The meeting will be hosted by Bree Bacon (McCollum Orchards & Gardens). Bree will share her experience in social media marketing and passive farm income.
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Announcements

NY Crop Insurance Availability by County & Crops

Apiculture, Dairy-RP, LGM, Nursery, PRF and WFRP policies are available throughout the entire state. A table has been developed showing RMA crop insurance availability by county and crop in New York State.

If a crop is not covered in your county, you may still be eligible for a written agreement for that crop. Please contact an insurance agent to see if this is an option for you.

More information about crop insurance is available through Cornell's New York Crop Insurance Education Program.

Cornell Commercial Vegetable Guidelines Available

The 2019 Cornell Integrated Crop and Pest Management Guidelines for Commercial Vegetable Production are now available!

Written by Cornell University specialists, this publication is designed to offer producers, seed and chemical dealers, and crop consultants practical information on growing and managing vegetable crops in New York State. Topics include general culture, nutrient management, transplant production, postharvest handling, organic production, and managing common vegetable crop pest concerns. A preview of the Vegetable Guidelines can be seen online.

Highlighted changes in the 2019 Vegetable Guidelines include:
  • Updated pesticide options for economically important vegetable crop pests.
  • New pests: beet armyworm in beets; cabbage looper and tarnished plant bug in lettuce and endive; allium leafminer in onions; and Cladosporium, Cercospora, and Stemphylium leaf spots in spinach.
Cornell Crop and Pest Management Guidelines are available as a print copy ($41), online-only access ($41), or a package combining print and online access ($57.50). Shipping charges will be added to your order. Cornell Guidelines can be obtained through many local Cornell Cooperative Extension offices, or from The Cornell Store at Cornell University or call (844) 688-7620.

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