Cornell Vegetable Program Enrollment

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Beets

Beets Did you know that New York is the second leading producer of red table beets in the US? Approximately 3,000 acres are grown annually for processing by Seneca Foods in Leiceister, NY (Livingston Co.). Most of the processing beets are grown in Genesee, Livingston and Wyoming Counties in Western, NY. Processors require specific varieties for production of certain size roots throughout the season and commonly grow Ruby Queen, Red Ace and Red Atlas.

Fresh market growers have a wide range of varieties to select from. Root colors include red, golden, or alternating red and white rings. Roots may be cylindrical or elongated. Beets can be harvested for fresh market at any stage and the greens are considered a delicacy by some. Roots harvested in the fall can be stored and sold at winter markets.

Educational and research information from Cornell Cooperative Extension can be found by clicking on the links below.

Most Recent Beets Content

Be on the Lookout for Southern Blight

Ethan Grundberg, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: April 27, 2018

Southern Blight (Sclerotium rolfsii) was found on golden storage beets this winter in Dutchess County. The fungal pathogen is fairly new to New York and poses a threat to a wide range of vegetable crops. Early detection and proper diagnosis are key to managing this disease.


Video: New York State Produce Auctions

Last Modified: March 8, 2018
Video: New York State Produce Auctions

Currently, there are 8 produce auctions in New York State. These auctions are aggregation points that allow local farmers to sell their produce in wholesale lots to buyers from across the region. To document the economic impact of produce auctions on agriculture, local businesses, family farms, and produce buyers, the Cornell Vegetable Program worked with Harvest New York to survey top sellers and buyers.

A new Cornell Vegetable Program video shares general information about produce auctions, how buyers and sellers use the auctions to expand their businesses, and how local communities benefit from them.

Video: Flea Beetles

Last Modified: June 5, 2017
Video: Flea Beetles

Flea beetles are a common vegetable pest affecting peppers, cucurbits, sweet potato, potato, peas, beans, beets, tomato, corn, turnip, pumpkin, melon, eggplant, and others. This short video gives you some general information about this pest.


More Beets Content

2016 Weed Research in Vegetable Crops, Cornell University
Cold Storage Chart and Reference Guide to Commercial Vegetable Storage
Crop Cooling and Storage
How to Sign the Waiver for the Indemnified Dual Magnum Label
2016 Beet Herbicide Chart
Priaxor: New Fungicide for Upstate NY Growers
Winter Aphid Management Fact Sheet
Extending the Harvest Season with Fall Production
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Upcoming Events

Women in Agriculture Discussion Group: Urban Farming

May 6, 2019
Monday, 6:30 - 8:00 PM
Buffalo, NY

Each monthly Women in Ag discussion group meeting will feature an established, innovative Farm-her leading the group on a tour of her operation and sharing her expertise on business management and production. Several guest speakers, as well as Cornell Vegetable Program staff, will be brought in to act as resource people for developing solutions to common production challenges.

The May 6 meeting will cover positive public relations and navigating municipal ordinances in urban farming. The meeting will be hosted by Mayda Pozantides (Groundwork Market Garden) and Allison DeHonney (Urban Fruits & Veggies). Participants will learn about production in urban soils and how to adapt farming techniques for urban environments.
view details

Women in Agriculture Discussion Group: Small Fruit & Vegetable Production plus Insect Control

July 15, 2019
Monday, time TBA
East Aurora, NY

Each monthly Women in Ag discussion group meeting will feature an established, innovative Farm-her leading the group on a tour of her operation and sharing her expertise on business management and production. Several guest speakers, as well as Cornell Vegetable Program staff, will be brought in to act as resource people for developing solutions to common production challenges.

The July 15 meeting will cover small fruit production and insect control led by Elizabeth Buck, CCE Cornell Vegetable Program, and Abby Seaman, NYS IPM Program. The meeting will be hosted by Gayle and Naomi Thorpe (Thorpe's Organic Family Farm). Gayle and Naomi will share their experiences managing a diversified organic farming operation and family farm transitions.
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Announcements

How to Take a Soil Sample

Soil sampling is an important part of managing your crops, but it's important to do it correctly. In this video created by the Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture Program, Vegetable Specialist Amy Ivy demonstrates how to take a soil sample.

For more information or to get soil sampling forms and supplies, visit Agro-One online.

Cornell Commercial Vegetable Guidelines Available

The 2019 Cornell Integrated Crop and Pest Management Guidelines for Commercial Vegetable Production are now available!

Written by Cornell University specialists, this publication is designed to offer producers, seed and chemical dealers, and crop consultants practical information on growing and managing vegetable crops in New York State. Topics include general culture, nutrient management, transplant production, postharvest handling, organic production, and managing common vegetable crop pest concerns. A preview of the Vegetable Guidelines can be seen online.

Highlighted changes in the 2019 Vegetable Guidelines include:
  • Updated pesticide options for economically important vegetable crop pests.
  • New pests: beet armyworm in beets; cabbage looper and tarnished plant bug in lettuce and endive; allium leafminer in onions; and Cladosporium, Cercospora, and Stemphylium leaf spots in spinach.
Cornell Crop and Pest Management Guidelines are available as a print copy ($41), online-only access ($41), or a package combining print and online access ($57.50). Shipping charges will be added to your order. Cornell Guidelines can be obtained through many local Cornell Cooperative Extension offices, or from The Cornell Store at Cornell University or call (844) 688-7620.

Empire State Producers EXPO Proceedings

Proceedings from the Empire State Producers EXPO conference from 2011-2019 are available online.

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