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  • Cultural Practices

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Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes Although sweet potatoes have been grown in New York, they have received much more attention in the last couple of years due to the value of the health benefits it offers. Even though acreage is not normally recorded, we estimate that there are over 200 acres of sweet potatoes being grown throughout NYS. However, due to the long growing season that is required (100 days plus), they are generally produced on raised beds mulched with black plastic. Orange skinned, orange fleshed types are the dominant types grown here, but there are also white skinned, white fleshed and orange skinned, white fleshed varieties grown in the state. Sweet potatoes have also gained popularity with organic producers to replace winter squash production due to the fact that they have almost no disease or insect problems when grown here and can be stored longer then winter squash in many cases. The increase in winter farmer's markets or winter CSA shares has also increased sweet potato production in NY. However, deer and mice can be major vertebrate pests of sweet potatoes. Variety trials, plant density research and the use of floating rowcovers for increased production are being evaluated in the Capital District region of NY.
Most Recent Sweet Potatoes Content

Video: Flea Beetles

Last Modified: June 5, 2017
Video: Flea Beetles

Flea beetles are a common vegetable pest affecting peppers, cucurbits, sweet potato, potato, peas, beans, beets, tomato, corn, turnip, pumpkin, melon, eggplant, and others. This short video gives you some general information about this pest.

Video: New York State Produce Auctions

Last Modified: April 30, 2015
Video: New York State Produce Auctions

Currently, there are 6 produce auctions in New York State. These auctions are aggregation points that allow local farmers to sell their produce in wholesale lots to buyers from across the region. To document the economic impact of produce auctions on agriculture, local businesses, family farms, and produce buyers, the Cornell Vegetable Program worked with HarvestNY to survey top sellers and buyers.

A new Cornell Vegetable Program video shares general information about produce auctions, how buyers and sellers use the auctions to expand their businesses, and how local communities benefit from them.

Responding to Hailstorms

Crystal Stewart, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: June 26, 2013
Responding to Hailstorms

While no one wants to think about the possibility of hail hitting their beautiful crops just as they start to respond to the heat and take off, the likelihood that we will see more hail seems pretty high. So let's talk about it.


More Sweet Potatoes Content

Improving the Quality and Yield of Sweet Potatoes in New York: 2010 Results
Improving the Quality and Yield of Sweet Potatoes in New York: 2011 Results
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Upcoming Events

Muck Donut Hour Every Tuesday

August 1, 2017
8:30 - 9:30 AM
Elba, NY

Meet with Cornell Vegetable Program Specialist Christy Hoepting every Tuesday morning to ask questions and share your observations.
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Fresh Market Minutes - Eden Valley

August 1, 2017
9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Eden, NY

Meet with the Cornell Vegetable Program Specialist Darcy Telenko every other Tuesday morning to ask questions and share your observations in fresh market vegetables.
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2017 Vegetable Pest and Cultural Management Field Meeting - Chautauqua County

Event Offers DEC Credits

August 8, 2017
6:00 PM
Frewsburg, NY

This course will demonstrate pest management in fresh market vegetables in both field and greenhouse (high tunnel) vegetables; primarily for those growing for wholesale auction. A hands-on demonstration of weed, insect and disease identification in vegetables including management options such as inter-row cover crops, grafting and where appropriate, spray options will be used to educate growers. CVP Specialists Judson Reid, DarcyTelenko, and Robert Hadad will instruct participants and facilitate peer-based learning. Details on each topic will focus on field observations at the farm. 
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Announcements

Late Blight Spreading Across WNY Counties

7/19/17 - Late blight (LB) was confirmed in Livingston County on potato this week (the genotype is still being determined). The sample from Erie County from last week was determined to be US-23 which is sensitive to metalaxyl. All of Western NY is at risk for Late Blight infection. Severity values continue build at all stations. The frequent and continuing rainfall has been extremely favorable for the development of LB. Scout fields twice a week. All tomato and potato growers, conventional and organic, should be applying a protectant fungicides and monitoring the DSS to determine spray intervals. Remember to rotate fungicide FRAC groups and use contact fungicides in your program to minimize the chances of fungicides resistance.

If late blight is suspected act immediately! Under favorable environmental conditions late blight develops very rapidly and can spread many miles in a short period. Please take a sample for isolate identification. It is very important to track disease movement. Contact CCE Cornell Vegetable Program Specialists for assistance.

Cucurbit Downy Mildew Confirmed in WNY

Cucurbit downy mildew has been confirmed in Erie County. There have also been confirmed reports from OH, PA and Ontario Canada. If you're planning on spraying cucumbers to control downy mildew, now is the time to do it!

Characteristic disease symptoms are angular, pale green areas bounded by the leaf veins. They will turn yellow and later necrotic. Under high humidity conditions sporulation will occur on the lower leaf surface. Apply targeted fungicides tank-mixed with protectant fungicides weekly and alternated among available modes of action (FRAC code), starting when there is risk for a specific crop based on forecasting program. Refer to the Cornell Vegetable Guidelines for a complete list of products available.

For more information about the disease, watch our new video Better Know a Pest: Downy Mildew or contact Robert Hadad or Darcy Telenko.

Better Know a Pest Video Series

The CCE Cornell Vegetable Program has created 3 new, short videos about common vegetable pests: flea beetlesswede midge, and downy mildew. The videos are part of a series called Better Know a Pest. Watch for more videos as the season progresses.

2017 Cornell Vegetable Guidelines Available

The 2017 edition of the Cornell Integrated Crop and Pest Management Guidelines for Commercial Vegetable Production is now available. This annual publication provides up-to-date vegetable crop production information for New York State. It is designed as a practical guide for vegetable crop producers, crop consultants, ag chemical dealers, and others who advise vegetable crop producers.

In addition to the annually revised pesticide and crop production information, highlighted changes in this edition of the
Vegetable Guidelines include:
  • Addition of Dickeya blackleg on potato as a disease of concern.
  • Updated regulatory considerations for organic vegetable production.
  • Revised European corn borer management strategies for beans and potatoes.
The Cornell Guidelines are available as a print copy ($41 plus shipping), online-only access ($41), or a package that combines print and online access ($57.50 plus shipping). Cornell Guidelines can be purchased through your local Cornell Cooperative Extension office or from the Cornell Store at Cornell University. To order from the Cornell Store, call (844) 688-7620 or order online.

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