Cornell Vegetable Program Enrollment

Program Areas

  • Food Safety
  • Variety Evaluation
  • Market Development
  • Pest Management
  • Cultural Practices

Enrollment Benefits

  • Telephone / Email Consultations
  • VegEdge Newsletter
  • Direct Mailings
  • Educational Meetings & Conferences
  • In-Field Educational Opportunities
  • On-Farm Research Trials

CVP Enrollment Form (PDF; 136KB)

Enrollee Login


Log In To Access:

  • Issues of VegEdge Newletters
  • Helpful Diagnostic Tool:
      What's wrong with my crop?

Not an Enrollee? Enroll Now!

Online Enrollment Form

Organic

OrganicAccording to the Northeast Organic Farming Association of NY (NOFA-NY), organic farming "seeks to maintain and improve the productivity of the land by encouraging and enhancing natural biological processes. Organic farmers nurture healthy plants by working to create a foundation of healthy soil. Great attention is paid to nurturing the soil with composts, cover crops, rock minerals and natural fertilizers. Plant disease and pests are controlled through the use of crop rotations, resistant varieties, cultivation, biological pest controls and botanical controls. The use of synthetic chemical fertilizers and pesticides are prohibited in certified organic production."

The number of organic farmers in NYS continues to increase, driven in part by the increasing demand from consumers for produce that is free of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides. The Cornell Vegetable Program has been working with organic farmers to determine their needs and offer alternatives to conventional production methods.



Relevant Event

3rd Annual Vegetable Pest Management Field Day

Event Offers DEC Credits

August 23, 2018
4:00 PM - 7:00 PM plus light supper and networking
Portland, NY

Most Recent Organic Content

Organic Production Guides

Robert Hadad, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: July 17, 2017
Organic Production Guides

Organic Production Guides for fruits, vegetables and dairy are available through the NYS Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program. They outline general practices for growing vegetable and fruit crops using organic integrated pest management techniques.

2017 Cucurbit Downy Mildew Management Guidelines

Last Modified: July 5, 2017
2017 Cucurbit Downy Mildew Management Guidelines

From Margaret McGrath, Cornell
Producing a high-quality cucurbit crop necessitates effectively managing downy mildew. This foliar disease is common in the northeast because the pathogen produces a large quantity of asexual spores that are easily dispersed long distances by wind, which enables it to spread widely. There has been no evidence that the pathogen is surviving between growing seasons where winter temperatures kill cucurbit crops (outdoors above the 30th latitude); however, recently both mating types have been found, albeit typically on different cucurbit crop types, thus there is the potential for the pathogen to produce oospores (sexual spores) that could enable the pathogen to survive in northern areas of the USA. The downy mildew forecasting program has documented based on downy mildew occurrence movement of the pathogen throughout the eastern USA each year via its wind-dispersed asexual spores. The pathogen does not affect fruit directly; however, affected leaves die prematurely which results in fewer fruit and/or fruit of low quality (poor flavor, sunscald, poor storability).

The most important component of an effective management program for downy mildew is an effective, properly-timed fungicide program. And the key to that is applying mobile fungicides targeted to the pathogen starting when there is a risk of the pathogen being present. Mobile (or translaminar) fungicides are needed for control on the underside of leaves. Each year there often are changes to the fungicides recommended as the pathogen develops resistance or new products are registered. Because these fungicides have targeted activity, additional fungicides must be added to the program when there is a need to manage other diseases such as powdery mildew. Most targeted fungicides effective for downy mildew are also effective for Phytophthora blight.

Nitrogen Fertility Options for Organic High Tunnels

Cordelia Machanoff, Program Aide
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: May 25, 2017
Nitrogen Fertility Options for Organic High Tunnels

Several years of foliar sampling in high tunnel tomatoes throughout NYS has shown that organic high tunnel tomatoes generally start out with sufficient or even excess nitrogen, but go into a mid-season dive in foliar nitrogen levels. Given the longer season and higher yields of tunnel tomatoes, a nitrogen fertilizer to inject or side-dress will help prevent mid-season deficiencies.


More Organic Content

Garlic Production in the Northeast (from NOFA NY's Winter Conference, 2015)
Garlic Bloat Nematode Fact Sheet and Sample Submission Form
Living Mulch Project Update
Winter Aphid Management Fact Sheet
2014 Potato Disease Management Strategies for Conventional & Organic Production
2014 Tomato Disease Management Strategies
Grafting Tomatoes Video: The Motivation and Benefits of Grafting
How to Graft Tomatoes: An Instructional Video and Factsheet
Copper Fungicides for Organic Disease Management in Vegetables
How Copper Sprays Work and Avoiding Phytotoxicity
SARE Cover Crop Topic Room: Current Research from Across the Nation
Garlic Weed Control
Leek Moth Control and Information
Spring Garlic Recommendations
Resource Guide for Organic Insect and Disease Management
more crops
Asparagus

Asparagus

Beets

Beets

Broccoli

Broccoli

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels Sprouts

Cabbage

Cabbage

Carrots

Carrots

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

Cucumbers

Cucumbers

Dry Beans

Dry Beans

Eggplant

Eggplant

Ethnic Vegetables

Ethnic Vegetables

Garlic

Garlic

Horseradish

Horseradish

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Leeks

Leeks

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Melons

Melons

Onions

Onions

Parsnips

Parsnips

Peas

Peas

Peppers

Peppers

Potatoes

Potatoes

Pumpkins / Gourds

Pumpkins / Gourds

Radishes

Radishes

Rhubarb

Rhubarb

Rutabaga

Rutabaga

Snap Beans

Snap Beans

Squash - Summer

Squash - Summer

Squash- Winter

Squash- Winter

Sweet Corn

Sweet Corn

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Turnips

Turnips

more crops
view calendar of events

Upcoming Events

Fresh Market Vegetable Grading & Packing Workshop

August 21, 2018
2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Deposit, NY

Are you interested in farm to school or selling to institutional markets? Maybe you'd like to know more about grading and packing your fresh market produce right in the field? CCE Broome County, in partnership with the CCE Cornell Vegetable Program and the Cornell Baskets to Pallets program, is offering a hands-on, on-farm experience designed to prepare farms in NY, both beginning and experienced, to enter new markets.
view details

Oswego Onion Growers Twilight Meeting

Event Offers DEC Credits

August 22, 2018
4:00 PM registration, 4:30-6:30 PM educational program, 7:00 PM dinner
Oswego, NY

This in-field twilight meeting will feature a tour of Christy Hoepting's fungicide trial for Stemphylium leaf blight and Botrytis leaf blight. Hoepting will share head to head comparisons of FRAC groups, alternatives to FRAC 3 and 7, reduced rates, and fungicide programs. A first look at 2018 results from onion thrips research trials will be presented by Brian Nault and Ashley Leach, Cornell University. Hear about the 2018 onion maggot research trial results and new research initiative with Brian Nault and Erica Moretti. Hoepting will also provide information about a new seed treatment for onion smut control.
view details

3rd Annual Vegetable Pest Management Field Day

Event Offers DEC Credits

August 23, 2018
4:00 PM - 7:00 PM plus light supper and networking
Portland, NY

Research trial results, cultural technique showcases, and effective varieties and treatments for organic and IPM production are the meeting focus. We will highlight current disease issues, their detection & spread based on this season's climate conditions, and management tools available to reduce yield impacts. Sessions will also be offered on pest identification and control options.  Regional equipment dealers and industry representatives will be invited to display equipment and new technology.

2.25 DEC credits available in categories 1a, 10 and 23
view details
view calendar of events

Announcements

Growing for Wholesale Guidelines Available

Grading and packing guidelines are available for 17 commonly grown specialty crops in NYS: acorn squash, broccoli crowns, Brussels sprouts, corn, green peppers, cucumbers, green cabbage, red cabbage, savory cabbage, cauliflower, eggplant, green beans, jalapenos, poblanos, Hungarian hot peppers, summer squash, and zucchini.

Acceptable quality standards and common defects that should be sorted out on the grading line are depicted in these resources, both visually and in outline form. Find all of the grading sheets here.

Vegetable Sizing Templates Available

To assist farmers looking to sell into wholesale markets, vegetable sizing templates are now available for bell peppers, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, cucumbers, eggplant, potatoes, tomatoes, zucchini and summer squash. The crop templates are scaled to size (8.5 x 11 paper). They can be printed and used to create sizing templates to be used by workers on the wash and pack lines. Additional grading resources are available too.

Managing Bird Damage in Sweet Corn

Former CCE Cornell Vegetable Program Specialist Darcy Telenko shares information on her on-farm research of bird management options to minimize damage to sweet corn in this video and final report. Learn more about the tools she evaluated -- chemical control, air dancers, scare-eye balloons, and detasseling.

Watch the video now! 
Read the final report now!

This research was supported by a Northeast SARE Partnership Grant and the New York Farm Viability Institute.

Empire State Producers EXPO Proceedings

Proceedings from the Empire State Producers EXPO conference from 2011-2018 are available online.

NEWSLETTER  |  CURRENT PROJECTS  |  IMPACT IN NY  |  SPONSORSHIP  |  RESOURCES  |  SITE MAP
Cornell Vegetable Program - Cornell Cooperative Extension
Your Trusted Source for Research-Based Knowledge