Cornell Vegetable Program Enrollment

Program Areas

  • Food Safety
  • Variety Evaluation
  • Market Development
  • Pest Management
  • Cultural Practices

Enrollment Benefits

  • Telephone / Email Consultations
  • VegEdge Newsletter
  • Direct Mailings
  • Educational Meetings & Conferences
  • In-Field Educational Opportunities
  • On-Farm Research Trials

CVP Enrollment Form (PDF; 180KB)

Enrollee Login


Log In To Access:

  • Issues of VegEdge Newletters
  • Helpful Diagnostic Tool:
      What's wrong with my crop?

Not an Enrollee? Enroll Now!

Online Enrollment Form

Greenhouse & Tunnels

Greenhouse & TunnelsThe use of season extension technologies such as high tunnels and greenhouses are important to farmers in our region that want to capitalize on the "eat local" movement. Greenhouses help farmers by extending their season and are great for consumers by keeping a supply of local fruits and vegetables available year-round.

Season extension can also be a tool for pest and disease control.




Relevant Event

2017 WNY Winter Fresh Market Vegetable Meeting (Eastern region)

Event Offers DEC Credits

March 7, 2017
8:30 AM - 3:30 PM
Newark, NY

Most Recent Greenhouse & Tunnels Content

Best Management Practices in High Tunnel Production: Site Selection

Elizabeth Buck, Field Technician
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: November 28, 2016
Best Management Practices in High Tunnel Production: Site Selection

Deciding where to put a new high tunnel requires careful consideration regarding sun and wind exposure, access to water, drainage and the best possible soil. A good site will set you up for success by avoiding potential problems. 

The 'Late Blight' of Spinach in the Northeast. See it? Report it! Manage it!

Last Modified: November 15, 2016
The 'Late Blight' of Spinach in the Northeast. See it? Report it! Manage it!

Downy mildew has been found recently in spinach at several farms in the northeastern U.S. This devastating disease has not been confirmed in the region for several years, thankfully as it has been a major production constraint in California. Pathogens causing downy mildew are Oomycetes and thus are related to the late blight pathogen. They are similar in ability to produce an abundance of wind-dispersed spores capable of moving long distances and to not need leaves to be wet to infect (high humidity is sufficient), plus ability to devastate crops.

All growers with spinach should inspect their plants for symptoms promptly NOW and also in spring plantings to catch if there is carry over or new outbreaks. If downy mildew is suspected, please contact your local extension specialist and send an email to Meg McGrath.

It will be CRITICAL that all high tunnel and overwintering spinach crops with downy mildew be destroyed couple weeks before the start of the spring spinach production season in the region to avoid carry over into 2017.

Cornell High Tunnels Website

Last Modified: May 23, 2016
Cornell High Tunnels Website

The Cornell High Tunnel website has been redesigned to help farmers profit from the use of high tunnels to extend their growing season and produce higher quality vegetables, fruit and flowers. The site contains information on the different types of structures and the resources for high tunnel profitability. Events, Tweets from Judson Reid, and the latest blog articles are accessible as well.  


More Greenhouse & Tunnels Content

Video: Moving a High Tunnel
Best Management Practices in High Tunnel Production: Optimal Tomato Spacing
Cucumbers in High Tunnels
Leaf Mold in High Tunnel Tomatoes 2015
Tomatoes for High Tunnels
Training and Pruning Tomatoes in High Tunnels
Video: New York State Produce Auctions
Tomatoes for the High Tunnel: Determinate versus Indeterminate
Winter Aphid Management Fact Sheet
10 Snow-Related Causes of Greenhouse Failure
Reduce Storm Damage to Your Greenhouses
Salvaging Your Greenhouse After a Heavy Snow Storm
Grafting Tomatoes Video: The Motivation and Benefits of Grafting
How to Graft Tomatoes: An Instructional Video and Factsheet
Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) in Tomatoes
Extending the Harvest Season with Fall Production
Grafting of Tomatoes for Soil-based Production in Greenhouses & High Tunnels
» View Complete List of Greenhouse & Tunnels Content
more crops
Asparagus

Asparagus

Beets

Beets

Broccoli

Broccoli

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels Sprouts

Cabbage

Cabbage

Carrots

Carrots

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

Cucumbers

Cucumbers

Dry Beans

Dry Beans

Eggplant

Eggplant

Ethnic Vegetables

Ethnic Vegetables

Garlic

Garlic

Horseradish

Horseradish

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Leeks

Leeks

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Melons

Melons

Onions

Onions

Parsnips

Parsnips

Peas

Peas

Peppers

Peppers

Potatoes

Potatoes

Pumpkins / Gourds

Pumpkins / Gourds

Radishes

Radishes

Rhubarb

Rhubarb

Rutabaga

Rutabaga

Snap Beans

Snap Beans

Squash - Summer

Squash - Summer

Squash- Winter

Squash- Winter

Sweet Corn

Sweet Corn

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Turnips

Turnips

more crops
view calendar of events

Upcoming Events

Veggie Farming Webinar Series, Part 2: From Season-Long Care to Harvest

March 1 - March 29, 2017
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM Wednesday evenings

This five-week course online (BF121) on Wednesday evenings in March covers vegetable production from transplanting to harvest, including information on in-season fertility, integrated pest management, weed control options, harvesting strategies, and tips for marketing your products. Designed for aspiring farmers and those with at least one growing season of vegetable farming experience. You should already have basic understanding of how to select crops, manage bed prep, seeding, and transplanting.
view details

2017 NYS Dry Bean Meeting

Event Offers DEC Credits

March 6, 2017
9:30 AM - 2:30 PM
Batavia, NY

Join us for research and production updates on dry bean varieties and bean breeding, weed management, Western bean cutworm, and white mold disease. There will also be an update on food safety practices and documentation required by buyers. We will also review research priorities and gather suggestions for future educational programs.
view details

2017 WNY Winter Fresh Market Vegetable Meeting (Eastern region)

Event Offers DEC Credits

March 7, 2017
8:30 AM - 3:30 PM
Newark, NY

Regional Fresh Market Winter Vegetable Meetings will be hosted by the Cornell Vegetable Program to discuss results from 2016 research trials and present information on pest management. Program topics will include an update on wildlife management, high tunnel nutrient management update, vegetable disease update including the new iPiPE Program in vegetables, new Climate Smart Farming Tools, cover crops and soil health, an update on Food Safety and Modernization Act and what you need to do for your farm, and other regional research and program updates.
view details
view calendar of events

Announcements

Student Research Internships Working with the CVP

The Cornell Vegetable Program is looking to hire two student research interns this summer to assist in scouting fresh market vegetables in western New York. This internship will start in May, working alongside Darcy Telenko, as part of the iPiPE CAP (Integrated Pest Information Platform for Extension and Education, Cooperative Agricultural Project) internship program. iPiPE is committed to investing in the coaching and development of future agricultural scientists/extension educators through a limited term internship experience in an applied environment. The purpose of the program is to learn how to scout for pests in the field and contribute observations to the iPiPE platform. These positions are 5-month appointments (39 hours/week) and will be located in the CCE Erie County Office (East Aurora, New York).

Applicants must apply online. View the full job description, qualifications, and application instructions.

Empire State Producers EXPO Proceedings Available

Proceedings from the Empire State Producers EXPO conference from 2011-2017 are available online. 

2017 Cornell Vegetable Guidelines Available

The 2017 edition of the Cornell Integrated Crop and Pest Management Guidelines for Commercial Vegetable Production is now available. This annual publication provides up-to-date vegetable crop production information for New York State. It is designed as a practical guide for vegetable crop producers, crop consultants, ag chemical dealers, and others who advise vegetable crop producers.

In addition to the annually revised pesticide and crop production information, highlighted changes in this edition of the
Vegetable Guidelines include:
  • Addition of Dickeya blackleg on potato as a disease of concern.
  • Updated regulatory considerations for organic vegetable production.
  • Revised European corn borer management strategies for beans and potatoes.
The Cornell Guidelines are available as a print copy ($41 plus shipping), online-only access ($41), or a package that combines print and online access ($57.50 plus shipping). Cornell Guidelines can be purchased through your local Cornell Cooperative Extension office or from the Cornell Store at Cornell University. To order from the Cornell Store, call (844) 688-7620 or order online.

NEW! Pesticide Product Search Online

The NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) Bureau of Pest Management has released a new pesticide product registration database. When visiting the webpage, please select the Products icon on the right side of the page to perform product searches.

This pesticide search database is replacing the Product, Ingredient, and Manufacturer System (PIMS) product database that has been hosted by Cornell University since its inception.

The new search database includes many added features, including site and pest searches. Additionally, updates to the product data and labeling will be reflected instantaneously. 

NEWSLETTER  |  CURRENT PROJECTS  |  IMPACT IN NY  |  SPONSORSHIP  |  RESOURCES  |  SITE MAP
Cornell Vegetable Program - Cornell Cooperative Extension
Your Trusted Source for Research-Based Knowledge