Cornell Vegetable Program Enrollment

Program Areas

  • Food Safety
  • Variety Evaluation
  • Market Development
  • Pest Management
  • Cultural Practices

Enrollment Benefits

  • Telephone / Email Consultations
  • VegEdge Newsletter
  • Direct Mailings
  • Educational Meetings & Conferences
  • In-Field Educational Opportunities
  • On-Farm Research Trials

CVP Enrollment Form (PDF; 118KB)

Enrollee Login

Password:

Log In To Access:

  • Issues of VegEdge Newsletters
  • Helpful Diagnostic Tool:
      What's wrong with my crop?

Not an Enrollee? Enroll Now!

Online Enrollment Form

Northern Corn Leaf Blight in Sweet Corn

Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

August 8, 2016

Northern Corn Leaf Blight in Sweet Corn
Over the past 5 years, Northern Corn Leaf Blight (NCLB) has become a common occurrence in field and sweet corn in New York State. Researchers at Cornell University are working to determine why this disease has become more prevalent. Current hypotheses include: 1) new races of the fungus, 2) new corn hybrids may be more susceptible, 3) weather patterns that favor disease, and 4) changes in the larger cropping picture. There may be a sort of an "arms race" between new races of the fungus and new corn hybrids. Western NY has seen an increase in field corn being grown and increased disease in field corn creates additional inoculum for sweet corn in the region. If NCLB becomes severe, yields may be reduced. Fresh market sweet corn growers may also be concerned with lesions that appear on the husks, as the corn may be less marketable.

The fungus Exerohilum turcicum that causes NCLB survives as spores or mycelia on corn debris over the winter. The inoculum can be splashed onto the current corn crop or can arrive by wind. The spores can be moved long distances by wind. Early infections come from within the field and are more damaging. As the season progresses and the numbers of spores in the air increases, all fields become susceptible. Infection is favored by leaf wetness and cool weather (64-81 F) as typically occurs later in the growing season.

Lesions of NCLB begin as grayish green and become tan as they mature. The slender oblong shape, with tapered ends, gives them a cigar or boat-shaped appearance. Lesions range from 1 to 6 inches in length and may coalesce to cover the entire leaf. Spores are produced on the underside of the leaves, and appear as dusty green fuzz.

Resistant varieties and cultural practices to reduce inoculum and disease risk are the best practices. Fields should be scouted whorl through tassel. There is a scouting video for field corn developed by the NYS IPM Program (see list of resources below). Several fungicides are labeled and a listing can be found in the Cornell Vegetable Guidelines. 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

NYS IPM Scouting video:



Cornell NCLB fact sheet
includes lists of fungicides and their relative effectiveness. Note: check labels for sweet corn.

Vegetable MD Online, Sweet Corn Diseases

more crops
Asparagus

Asparagus

Beets

Beets

Broccoli

Broccoli

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels Sprouts

Cabbage

Cabbage

Carrots

Carrots

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

Cucumbers

Cucumbers

Dry Beans

Dry Beans

Eggplant

Eggplant

Ethnic Vegetables

Ethnic Vegetables

Garlic

Garlic

Horseradish

Horseradish

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Leeks

Leeks

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Melons

Melons

Onions

Onions

Parsnips

Parsnips

Peas

Peas

Peppers

Peppers

Potatoes

Potatoes

Pumpkins / Gourds

Pumpkins / Gourds

Radishes

Radishes

Rhubarb

Rhubarb

Rutabaga

Rutabaga

Snap Beans

Snap Beans

Squash - Summer

Squash - Summer

Squash- Winter

Squash- Winter

Sweet Corn

Sweet Corn

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Turnips

Turnips

more crops

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events at this time.

Announcements

Lorsban is Banned: What Now?

Cabbage maggot (CM) feeds on brassica seedlings by tunneling into the stem of the plant just below the soil line. Their feeding can result in unsightly and unmarketable produce in the case of root brassicas like turnips, and in stunting, reduced stand, and reduced yield in head and stem brassicas like cabbage and broccoli. Lorsban and other formulations containing the active ingredient chlorpyrifos were the first line of defense for control of cabbage maggot in several brassica crops, because 1) at ~$10 per acre, it was affordable, and 2) it was easy to apply and avoided worker exposure as a directed spray at the base of the plant.

Unfortunately, Lorsban and all of its generic products for food and feed uses were banned in New York as of July 31, 2021, and in the United States as of February 28, 2022. In the absence of Lorsban and other chlorpyrifos-containing insecticides, NY brassica growers have 6 products belonging to 4 chemical classes available to manage cabbage maggot. This article, Lorsban is Banned: How to Control Cabbage Maggot in Brassicas Now?, written by Cornell Vegetable Program Specialist Christy Hoepting and Brian Nault of Cornell AgriTech, provides our "2022 Top Picks" to use instead of Lorsban plus results of Cornell research trial results related to application method, rate, and cabbage maggot control.


Propagating Strawberry Plants Through Runners

The production of strawberry plants is challenging due to the rigorous sanitation needs that must be met, especially in field propagation settings, but also in greenhouse settings. To add to that, growers in New York may find it more difficult to obtain their preferred strawberry varieties in the coming years, as fewer nurseries are propagating strawberries. The solution: strawberry plug plants propagated from runners in a controlled environment such as a greenhouse or high tunnel.

Plug production of rarer varieties that do well in New York State will fetch a higher price than dormant bare-root plants due to the higher cost of production and lower availability in the Northeast, especially if plants are available in August. Propagating Strawberry Plants Through Runners, written by Anya Osatuke of CCE Harvest NY and Brad Bergefurd of The Ohio State University, only discusses production and marketing potential of plug plants because successful field production of bare-root strawberries is very difficult to achieve without the use of highly restricted soil fumigants. 



Cornell Commercial Vegetable Guidelines Available

The 2022 Cornell Integrated Crop and Pest Management Guidelines for Commercial Vegetable Production are now available!

Written by Cornell University specialists, this publication is designed to offer producers, seed and chemical dealers, and crop consultants practical information on growing and managing vegetable crops in New York State. Topics include general culture, nutrient management, transplant production, postharvest handling, organic production, and managing common vegetable crop pest concerns. A preview of the Vegetable Guidelines can be seen online.

Cornell Crop and Pest Management Guidelines are available as a print copy ($43.50), online-only access ($43.50), or a package combining print and online access ($61.00). Shipping charges will be added to your order. Cornell Guidelines can be obtained through many local Cornell Cooperative Extension offices (call to confirm availability), or from The Cornell Store at Cornell University or call (844) 688-7620.


NEWSLETTER  |   CURRENT PROJECTS  |   IMPACT IN NY  |   SPONSORSHIP  |   RESOURCES  |   SITE MAP