Cornell Vegetable Program Enrollment

Program Areas

  • Food Safety
  • Variety Evaluation
  • Market Development
  • Pest Management
  • Cultural Practices

Enrollment Benefits

  • Telephone / Email Consultations
  • VegEdge Newsletter
  • Direct Mailings
  • Educational Meetings & Conferences
  • In-Field Educational Opportunities
  • On-Farm Research Trials

CVP Enrollment Form (PDF; 191KB)

Enrollee Login


Log In To Access:

  • Issues of VegEdge Newletters
  • Helpful Diagnostic Tool:
      What's wrong with my crop?

Not an Enrollee? Enroll Now!

Online Enrollment Form

Greenhouse & Tunnels

Greenhouse & TunnelsThe use of season extension technologies such as high tunnels and greenhouses are important to farmers in our region that want to capitalize on the "eat local" movement. Greenhouses help farmers by extending their season and are great for consumers by keeping a supply of local fruits and vegetables available year-round.

Season extension can also be a tool for pest and disease control.




Relevant Event

2017 Empire State Producers EXPO

Event Offers DEC Credits

January 16 - January 19, 2017
Morning, Mid-day, and Afternoon Sessions
Syracuse, NY

Complete Greenhouse & Tunnels Content

Cornell High Tunnels Website

Last Modified: May 23, 2016
Cornell High Tunnels Website

The Cornell High Tunnel website has been redesigned to help farmers profit from the use of high tunnels to extend their growing season and produce higher quality vegetables, fruit and flowers. The site contains information on the different types of structures and the resources for high tunnel profitability. Events, Tweets from Judson Reid, and the latest blog articles are accessible as well.  

Video: Moving a High Tunnel

Cordelia Hall, Program Aide
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: May 19, 2016
Video: Moving a High Tunnel

Vegetable farmers have embraced the use of high tunnels to enhance productivity and quality of warm weather crops such as tomatoes, peppers, eggplant and cucumbers. Growers meeting the demand for fresh market produce through high tunnel production face a unique set of soil management challenges. Intensive cropping minimizes opportunities for fallow periods, cover cropping and other techniques for maintaining soil health and fertility. The plastic covering prevents rain from leaching the profile, leading to excess salts and alkalinity. By choosing a moveable tunnel design, like the one in this video, a grower can grow a protected crop continuously while allowing for fallow periods, cover cropping and movement of excess salts through the soil profile. Moveable tunnels can be moved laterally (as shown) or pulled lengthwise to cover an already established crop (ie. move the tunnel from summer tomatoes over fall greens).

Cucumbers in High Tunnels

Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: December 2, 2015
Cucumbers in High Tunnels

Cucumbers are an excellent high tunnel crop for spring, summer and fall production in New York State. Grown vertically, cucumbers take advantage of the space and light offered by a high tunnel. Cucumbers grown in this environment are of higher quality with higher yields. Very fast growing and yielding, they fit into crop plans that include winter greens easier than tomatoes, peppers or eggplants. 

Leaf Mold in High Tunnel Tomatoes 2015

Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: December 2, 2015
Leaf Mold in High Tunnel Tomatoes 2015

Leaf mold is a fungus disease of tomatoes that has been increasing across New York State in recent years. It is favored by high humidity and is therefore seen in greenhouse and high tunnel production but rarely in field production.

Site Selection for High Tunnels

Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: December 2, 2015
Site Selection for High Tunnels

Deciding where to put a new high tunnel requires careful consideration regarding to sun and wind exposure, access to water, drainage and the best possible soil. A good site will set you up for success by avoiding potential problems. 

Spacing Tomatoes in High Tunnels

Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: December 2, 2015

Proper spacing is a common concern of high tunnel growers. More plants does not necessarily mean more yield. Determinate varieties are spaced and trained differently than indeterminates, and grafted plants need more room than non-grafted. A well-spaced planting allows room for the grower to move down the aisles for harvesting, training and scouting for pest and disease problems.

Tomatoes for High Tunnels

Last Modified: December 2, 2015

One of the first choices when beginning high tunnel tomato production is the type: determinate or indeterminate. Differences in the growth habits, nutritional needs, disease resistance, and fruit attributes of determinate and indeterminate tomatoes will influence the types and varieties a grower will choose. 

Training and Pruning Tomatoes in High Tunnels

Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: December 2, 2015

Well trained and well pruned tomatoes are easy to work around, have better air circulation, optimum light penetration, and have higher yields since excess foliage is removed to focus plant energy on producing and ripening fruit. 

Video: New York State Produce Auctions

Last Modified: April 30, 2015
Video: New York State Produce Auctions

Currently, there are 6 produce auctions in New York State. These auctions are aggregation points that allow local farmers to sell their produce in wholesale lots to buyers from across the region. To document the economic impact of produce auctions on agriculture, local businesses, family farms, and produce buyers, the Cornell Vegetable Program worked with HarvestNY to survey top sellers and buyers.

A new Cornell Vegetable Program video shares general information about produce auctions, how buyers and sellers use the auctions to expand their businesses, and how local communities benefit from them.

Tomatoes for the High Tunnel: Determinate versus Indeterminate

Cordelia Hall, Program Aide
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: December 18, 2014
Tomatoes for the High Tunnel: Determinate versus Indeterminate

One of the first choices when beginning high tunnel tomato production is variety selection. This comparison guide will help with the decision.

Winter Aphid Management Fact Sheet

Cordelia Hall, Program Aide
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: December 8, 2014
Winter Aphid Management Fact Sheet

Aphids can be a major problem in winter greens. This fact sheet outlines our experience with biological and biorational controls over four years of field research.

10 Snow-Related Causes of Greenhouse Failure

Last Modified: November 26, 2014
10 Snow-Related Causes of Greenhouse Failure

From David Kuack, Greenhouse Grower, 6/4/2013:
John Bartok Jr., an agricultural engineer and University of Connecticut Professor Emeritus, says snow varies considerably in consistency and weight. It can be light and fluffy with a water equivalent of 12 inches equal to 1 inch of rain. Snow can also be wet and heavy with 3 to 4 inches equal to 1 inch of rain. Snow having a 1-inch rainwater equivalent loads a structure with 5.2 pounds per square foot. This amounts to about 6.5 tons on a 25- by 96-foot greenhouse.

Bartok says there are 10 reasons for structure failures during snow storms.

Reduce Storm Damage to Your Greenhouses

Last Modified: November 25, 2014
Reduce Storm Damage to Your Greenhouses

From John W. Bartok, Jr., Agricultural Engineer, Ashford, CT:
Nature seems to be getting more violent in recent years with frequent earthquakes, increased numbers of hurricanes and record breaking snowstorms. Insurance damage claims have increased considerably. The International Building Code has revised upward its wind and snow loading requirements for some areas of the U.S.

Each year there are reports of greenhouses that have been damaged by weather and natural events. Greenhouse design is different than conventional farm buildings in that the structural profile has to be small to allow maximum light to reach the plants. Most farm buildings are over designed to handle severe weather conditions.

Damage to greenhouses can include racking of the frame, bending of the hoops, broken glass or torn plastic and uplifted foundation posts. Preparation ahead of time can minimize the damage.

Salvaging Your Greenhouse After a Heavy Snow Storm

Last Modified: November 25, 2014
Salvaging Your Greenhouse After a Heavy Snow Storm

From John Bartok, Agricultural Engineer, Ashford, CT, 11/24/2014:
A quick checklist covering potential hazards and steps to take to salvage your greenhouse after a heavy snow storm.

Grafting Tomatoes Video: The Motivation and Benefits of Grafting

Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: October 16, 2013
Grafting Tomatoes Video: The Motivation and Benefits of Grafting

As soil based production of tomatoes continues in tunnels and greenhouses, risk of root-zone diseases, insects and nutrient imbalances increase. Grafting, the combination of two separate cultivars into one plant, is one management approach to these challenges. Learn more about the motivations and benefits of grafting tomatoes in this video of Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist for the Cornell Vegetable Program.

How to Graft Tomatoes: An Instructional Video and Factsheet

Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: October 16, 2013
How to Graft Tomatoes: An Instructional Video and Factsheet

Grafting can significantly increase tomato yields and increase plant resistance to soil-borne diseases. Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist with the Cornell Vegetable Program has developed a step-by-step tutorial for growers on how to graft tomatoes. 

Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) in Tomatoes

Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: September 23, 2013
Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) in Tomatoes

Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) has gained notoriety for its impact on berry crops. We are including an update here as it has also been documented to infest tomatoes.

As a brief recap, SWD is a new invasive fruit fly with the unique ability to lay eggs in unripe fruit. The eggs and larvae become crop contaminants, unfortunately often not apparent until post-harvest and sometimes post-sale. So far in 2013 SWD has been confirmed in the Hudson Valley (Ulster and Orange Counties); Northern New York (St. Lawrence Co.), Long Island (Suffolk Co.) and the Finger Lakes (Ontario Co.). These specimens were all caught in traps near berry plantings. From the wide range of geography and macro-climates of these confirmed findings we can infer that SWD is present throughout NYS. Read more to learn how much of a threat SWD is to tomato growers.

Extending the Harvest Season with Fall Production

Robert Hadad, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: July 11, 2013
Extending the Harvest Season with Fall Production

Late season production starts in mid spring. For a successful crop, start with a detailed plan. Designate an area specific for late season production so that management can take place in one spot rather than all over the farm. This will make cultivation, pest management, using row cover, and harvesting more efficient to manage.


Grafting of Tomatoes for Soil-based Production in Greenhouses & High Tunnels

Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: April 25, 2013
Grafting of Tomatoes for Soil-based Production in Greenhouses & High Tunnels

In 2012, the Cornell Vegetable Program conducted trials of grafted cucumbers and tomatoes. We grafted 2 tomato scions (Panzer and Big Dena) onto 3 different rootstocks (Arnold, Colossus and Maxifort). We also grew out ungrafted control plots for comparison. Tomatoes were grafted using the 'tube-graft' method. Detailed information on our materials and methods can be found in the full report.

SARE Season Extension Topic Room: Current Research from Across the Nation

Last Modified: April 25, 2013
SARE Season Extension Topic Room: Current Research from Across the Nation

A section of the Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education (SARE) website, the season extension topic room provides nationwide research in the areas of variety trials, fertility management, pest management, water management, energy, and marketing and economics.

High Tunnel Cucumber Trial, 2012

Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: March 7, 2013
High Tunnel Cucumber Trial, 2012

Greenhouse cucumbers, if marketed successfully, can be a high revenue crop in tunnels. Advantages include high quality fruit, decreased downy mildew, and quicker yields than tomatoes. Disadvantages include powdery mildew, spider mites, and higher labor than tomatoes. The Cornell Vegetable Program worked with several seed companies to conduct a variety trial of high tunnel cucumbers in 2012.

Low, Quick, and Caterpillar Tunnels: An Overview of Season Extension Techniques

Robert Hadad, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: January 24, 2013
Low, Quick, and Caterpillar Tunnels: An Overview of Season Extension Techniques

Season extension offers growers expanded times for growing produce. Getting an early jump or holding crops later into the sales season can really increase profits when the techniques are used and costs taken into account.

There are many styles and types of construction available on the internet but this presentation covers what is commonly available. Many suppliers carry hoop materials, row covers, and greenhouse film. Ingenuity and imagination creates more effective ways of set up and operation.

Home High Tunnel Construction

Elizabeth Buck, Field Technician
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: January 23, 2013
Home High Tunnel Construction

Are you interested in building your own high tunnel? Bowman and Hill Micro Farm hosted an October 18, 2012 Cornell Vegetable Program workshop in which participants learned to build a tunnel - onsite, in one day. This full color, step-by-step workshop transcription includes pictures, helpful hints, and notes about common mistakes.

Quick Tunnel Instruction Guide - Johnny's Selected Seeds

Last Modified: January 10, 2013
Quick Tunnel Instruction Guide - Johnny's Selected Seeds

Instruction manual for Quick Hoops Low Tunnel Benders by Johnny's Selected Seeds.

Zero Disease Tolerance in High Tunnels

Last Modified: January 10, 2013
Zero Disease Tolerance in High Tunnels

Printed in American Vegetable Grower, October 5, 2012:
Keeping crops free of disease is the goal of all growers, including those producing in high tunnels. Download the PDF file to learn about 20 practices that will reduce the chances of pathogens taking over when growing under cover.

Greenhouse Cucumber Variety Trial (2011)

Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: April 2, 2012
Greenhouse Cucumber Variety Trial (2011)

The unheated greenhouse, or high tunnel, offers a vertical production environment suitable for crops such as indeterminate tomatoes and cucumbers. As it is a soil based system however, and passively heated, greenhouse cucumbers must be transplanted later in the spring than tomatoes, due to their intolerance for low root zone temperatures. However, cucumbers can provide good returns when grown in a high tunnel, given consistent pest control and matching variety performance with market demand. A variety trial of four greenhouse cucumbers was established in a cooperating high tunnel in the spring of 2011.

High Tunnel Tomato Trial 2011 (determinate varieties)

Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: April 2, 2012
High Tunnel Tomato Trial 2011 (determinate varieties)

High tunnel tomatoes continue to grow in popularity with New York vegetable growers for disease control, earliness and fruit quality. Variety selection is one of the most important management decisions for tunnels. The decision between determinate and indeterminate varieties depends on grower preference and market demand. Total yield must be balanced with fruit quality and disease resistance

High Tunnel Pepper Variety Trial, 2011

Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: February 1, 2012
High Tunnel Pepper Variety Trial, 2011

Peppers offer a viable option to tomatoes for commercial production in high tunnel greenhouses. In 2011 the Cornell Vegetable Program partnered with Harris Seed, Inc. to evaluate five varieties in a cooperating grower unheated high tunnel.

The peppers evaluated in 2011 performed very similar in total yield per plant as measured by pounds. When we look at fruit size and weight we do find differences that can help growers make choices in variety. When selling by the piece, in a retail setting, varieties such as Yellow Crest would work well. For wholesale accounts varieties such as Gordo will fill bushel boxes faster. Sandpiper, a slightly smaller fruit than the other bell peppers is this trial, gave very good yields and offers a nice color spectrum. High tunnels are a great tool for vegetable growers to increase quality and color of bell peppers. Total economic performance per square foot is much less than tomatoes. However, labor inputs are also lower. Although not a perfect rotational crop with tomatoes, peppers are not a host for Fulvia Leaf Mold, and are less likely to harbor Two Spotted Spider Mites. We encourage growers to consider peppers in high tunnels for increased quality and yield.


Grafting Cucumbers in High Tunnels

Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: January 25, 2011
Grafting Cucumbers in High Tunnels

Soil based greenhouse and high tunnel production of vegetables has risen dramatically in New York recently. This season extension technology offers farmers an opportunity to target market price peaks and capitalize on rising demand for locally grown produce. Considerable attention has been given, justifiably, to tomatoes in these settings. Trials by the Cornell Vegetable Program confirm that cucumbers can also be grown at a profit in tunnels.

As production continues in the same soil beds, risk of root-zone diseases and soil nutrient deficiencies increase. Grafting, the combination of two separate cultivars into one plant, could be a solution to these challenges. Evaluations of grafted tomato by the Cornell Vegetable Program revealed several advantages. This project endeavored to graft cucumbers onto a fig leaf gourd (Cucurbita ficifolia) for increased yields and cold hardiness.

High Tunnel Hanging Baskets, 2010

Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: January 19, 2011
High Tunnel Hanging Baskets, 2010

Although Cornell Vegetable Program research from 2009 showed a net positive impact of hanging baskets of petunias on tunnel economic performance, tomato yields were decreased. In 2010 the project team repeated research in an unheated high tunnel, representing a dramatic decrease in fuel inputs compared to a heated greenhouse for hanging baskets. A lower density treatment was used, compared to 2009, and light intensity data was collected. Risks of shading an in-ground tomato crop and spread of insects and diseases between the flowers and vegetables were investigated.

Grafting of Tomatoes for Soil-based Production in Protected Culture

Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: April 15, 2010

Soil based greenhouse and high tunnel production of tomatoes has risen dramatically in the Finger Lakes Region within the last 5 years. This season extension technology offers farmers an opportunity to target market price peaks and capitalize on the rising demand for locally grown produce. Tomatoes from these protected culture systems have proven profitable in wholesale auction settings as well as farmer's markets and CSAs.

As production continues in the same soil beds, risk of root-zone diseases and soil nutrient deficiencies increase. Grafting of desirable fruiting varieties onto vigorous, disease resistant rootstock has become a standard production technique in hydroponic facilities throughout the world. This project seeks to evaluate the potential of grafting for small scale farmers in New York and demonstrate its advantages.

more crops
Asparagus

Asparagus

Beets

Beets

Broccoli

Broccoli

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels Sprouts

Cabbage

Cabbage

Carrots

Carrots

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

Cucumbers

Cucumbers

Dry Beans

Dry Beans

Eggplant

Eggplant

Ethnic Vegetables

Ethnic Vegetables

Garlic

Garlic

Horseradish

Horseradish

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Leeks

Leeks

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Melons

Melons

Onions

Onions

Parsnips

Parsnips

Peas

Peas

Peppers

Peppers

Potatoes

Potatoes

Pumpkins / Gourds

Pumpkins / Gourds

Radishes

Radishes

Rhubarb

Rhubarb

Rutabaga

Rutabaga

Snap Beans

Snap Beans

Squash - Summer

Squash - Summer

Squash- Winter

Squash- Winter

Sweet Corn

Sweet Corn

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Turnips

Turnips

more crops
view calendar of events

Upcoming Events

Muck Donut Hour Every Tuesday

June 7, 2016
8:30 - 9:30 AM
Elba, NY

Meet with Cornell Vegetable Program Specialist Christy Hoepting every Tuesday morning to ask questions and share your observations.
view details

Hands-on Field and Vegetable Pest Management

Event Offers DEC Credits

June 8, 2016
1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Cattaraugus, NY

This course will educate growers on weed and insect identification and management in mixed field crop and vegetable systems; with additional focus on integrated weed management. Topics such as resistant varieties, pest/disease, cultural management and appropriate spray options will be included
view details

Muck Donut Hour Every Tuesday

June 14, 2016
8:30 - 9:30 AM
Elba, NY

Meet with Cornell Vegetable Program Specialist Christy Hoepting every Tuesday morning to ask questions and share your observations. Grower experience is combined with research and scouting information for a whole lot of talk about growing ONIONS!
view details
view calendar of events

Announcements

Cornell High Tunnels Website Redesigned

The Cornell High Tunnel website has been redesigned to help farmers profit from the use of high tunnels to extend their growing season and produce higher quality vegetables, fruit and flowers. The site contains information on the different types of structures and the resources for high tunnel profitability. Events, Tweets by Judson Reid, and the latest blog articles are accessible as well.

Assisting Western New York Vegetable Growers

Western New York is a national leader in vegetable production and the largest vegetable producing region in the state of New York, contributing an estimated $280 million to the state's economy each year. The region grows a diverse set of crops including tomatoes, potatoes, sweet corn, pumpkins, cabbage and peppers on large acres, and another 50 crops on smaller plantings.

The Cornell Vegetable Program's video, "Meet the Cornell Vegetable Program" provides an introduction to our team of specialists and how we assist vegetable growers throughout the region. We greatly appreciate that several WNY vegetable growers shared their thoughts on what the Cornell Vegetable Program means to them: Paul Fenton, Batavia; Mark Zittel, Eden; and Matt Mortellaro, Elba. Watch the video now!

2016 Cornell Vegetable Guidelines Available

The 2016 edition of the Cornell Commercial Vegetable Production Guidelines is available. This annual publication provides up-to-date vegetable crop production information for New York State. It has been designed as a practical guide for vegetable crop producers, crop consultants, and ag suppliers. In addition to the annually revised pesticide and crop production information, this edition also includes the addition of several new pests of concern (seedcorn maggot in beans, leafminers in lettuce and endive, spider mites in peppers, anthracnose in spinach, and powdery mildew in tomatoes), a new table listing biofungicide options for vegetable production, revised management strategies for striped cucumber beetle in cucurbits and Stewart's wilt in sweet corn, and identification of pesticide active ingredients that meet EPA's criteria for acute toxicity to bees.

NOTE: Vegetable Guidelines are no longer be offered for free online. Instead, you will have the option to purchase just a print copy ($33 plus shipping), online version ($33), or a bundle of a print copy plus online access ($46 plus shipping). You can order this publication, or other Cornell Guidelines from the Cornell Store at Cornell University at 844-688-7620.

Empire State Producers EXPO Proceedings Available

Proceedings from the Empire State Producers EXPO conference from 2011-2016 are available online. 

NEWSLETTER  |  CURRENT PROJECTS  |  IMPACT IN NY  |  SPONSORSHIP  |  RESOURCES  |  SITE MAP
Cornell Vegetable Program - Cornell Cooperative Extension
Your Trusted Source for Research-Based Knowledge