Cornell Vegetable Program Enrollment

Program Areas

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  • Variety Evaluation
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  • Cultural Practices

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Event Details

Date

October 31, 2017

Time

9:30 AM - 2:00 PM

Location

Yarrow Hollow Farm
25 Denton Lake Rd
Holmes, NY

Cost

$20.00 per person

bring your own lunch, beverages provided

Host

CCE Putnam County
Jen Stengle
845-278-6738


Extending the Growing Season with High Tunnels

October 31, 2017

Extending the Growing Season with High Tunnels

You can extend your growing season with high tunnel greenhouses. Create an Integrated Pest Management Plan, rotating crops, grow alternatives to tomatoes, and manage diseases. Start growing earlier, and end your season later with a high tunnel greenhouse.

9:15 - 9:30 am

Sign in, get coffee, and get settled

9:30 - 10:00 am
Extending Growing Season & Farm Bill Programs:
Oscar will cover the different types of high tunnels, permanent vs moveable, double layer vs single layer, rafter spacing, snow loads. He will also discuss Farm Bill program options to assist with the implementation of a high tunnel system and other practices that benefit crops and soil.

Oscar Velez-Juarbe, Resource Conservationist covering Dutchess, Putnam & Westchester Counties

10:00 - 10:30 am
Tomatoes and Cucumbers and Peppers, Oh My!
Warm season crops thrive in high tunnels, even where summer temperatures are ideal. Amy will review how to grow some of the most profitable crops in high tunnels including tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers. She will include pruning and training as well as disease problems growers should be aware of.

Amy Ivy has been an Extension Horticulture Educator for 30 years in the northeastern corner of the state. About 10 years ago her attention shifted from ornamental horticulture to commercial vegetable production in general, and protected culture in particular. She is currently a regional vegetable specialist with the Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture Program which covers 17 counties along the east side of NYS from the Canadian border to Putnam County.

10:30 - 10:45 am
Break


10:45 - 11:15 am
There's More to Tunnels than Tomatoes:
While tomatoes are the most common high tunnel crop because they provide high returns, there's more to high tunnels than tomatoes. Jud will talk about using other crops as part of a crop rotation or timing them to utilize the high tunnel during cool seasons! Crop rotation is good for soil and pest management, and ideally provides a profitable net or the farmer. Which crops achieve these goals and how do we grow them?

Judson Reid spends his days working in high tunnels and his nights dreaming about them. This is because he operates one and worries about it flying away when the wind blows. Aside from this he is a Senior Extension Associate with the Cornell Vegetable Program and Harvest NY.

11:15 am - Noon
Creating an IPM Plan for High Tunnel Production:
Integrated Pest Management uses a variety of methods to achieve efficient and effective pest management. Each plan is specific to the operation and based on your crops, facilities, production systems, and sometimes very individual factors. Learn how to think about your operation in terms of integrated pest management to create your own plan.

Betsy Lamb is the Coordinator for Ornamental IPM with the NYS Integrated Pest Management program. She works with greenhouse, nursery, and Christmas tree producers on IPM (but she sneaks in greenhouse and high tunnel vegetables, too).

Noon - 1:00 pm
BYO Brown Bag Lunch & Networking

1:00 - 2:00 pm
Yarrow Hollow Farm, Sarah Lucas.
Tour the farm; see how Sarah has been using the high tunnels. Sarah grown food for the camp kitchen and offers and educational program as well for camp attendees and visitors.

Cost: $20 per person, bring your own lunch. Register online. For more information or help registering, contact Jen Stengle at 845-278-6738.

Brought to you by: New York State Integrated Pest Management Program, Putnam County Soil and Water Conservation District, Cornell Cooperative Extension of Putnam County




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Brussels Sprouts

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Cabbage

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Cauliflower

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Dry Beans

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Eggplant

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Garlic

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Horseradish

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Kohlrabi

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Leeks

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Lettuce / Leafy Greens

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Melons

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Onions

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Parsnips

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Peas

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Peppers

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Potatoes

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Pumpkins / Gourds

Pumpkins / Gourds

Radishes

Radishes

Rhubarb

Rhubarb

Rutabaga

Rutabaga

Snap Beans

Snap Beans

Squash - Summer

Squash - Summer

Squash- Winter

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Sweet Potatoes

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Upcoming Events

NYS Processing Vegetable Industry Roundtable Meeting

March 18, 2024
Batavia, NY

Processing vegetable industry members who grow, manage, or support crop production for Farm Fresh First/Nortera Foods, Seneca Foods and/or Love Beets, are encouraged to sign-up for the 2024 NYS Processing Vegetable Industry Roundtable! You will:

  • Network at this in-person meeting.
  • Learn the results of industry-funded research.
  • Have a voice in Cornell research and Extension.
  • Earn 3.25 DEC pesticide applicator recertification credits
  • Earn Certified Crop Advisor Credits

Oswego Muck Onion Growers Pre-Season Meeting: Stop the Rot, Nematodes and SLB Fungicide Resistance

Event Offers DEC Credits

March 20, 2024
Phoenix, NY

Christy Hoepting and Frank Hay will get growers ready for the season with updates on managing Stemphylium Leaf Blight fungicide resistance, progress made towards understanding and managing bacterial bulb rot of onion, and results of the 2023 nematode survey and research project. 2.5 DEC recertification credits will be offered in categories 1A, 10 and 23.

2024 NYS Dry Bean Meeting and Cutting Event

Event Offers DEC Credits

March 22, 2024
Geneva, NY

The NYS Dry Bean Meeting will be paired with the annual Dry Bean Cutting Event again this year! The morning meeting will include presentations on the latest dry bean research in New York, with topics including market updates, white mold management, western bean cutworm management, dry bean variety testing, and incorporating NY dry beans into schools. 1.5 DEC credits will be available in categories 10, 1a, 21, 23. CCA credits will be available too.

The Dry Bean Cutting will follow the meeting and showcase the canned dry beans from the 2023 Dry Bean Variety Trial. 

Announcements

Management Practices for High Organic Matter Soils

We are exploring management practices for vegetable farmers with high organic matter soils. These soils are usually found in urban growing areas as urban farmers typically grow in imported soil mixtures that have been constructed over time and in high tunnels where leaching events are limited. In both cases, we see that soil pH and calcium levels can increase due to alkaline irrigation water and with grower inputs such as high levels of compost and/or fertilizer. We commonly see limited plant nutrient uptake due to high soil pH. We have produced four "Management Practices for Urban Soil Health" case studies sharing project updates in our urban cover crop, pH adjustment, and bulk density adjustment work. In each case study, we are looking at the effect of the management practice on soil and crop health. 

Management Practices for Urban Soil Health: Cover Cropping
Management Practices for Urban Soil Health: pH Adjustment
Management Practices for Urban Soil Health: pH Adjustment in NYC
Management Practices for Urban Soil Health: Correcting Nutrient Test Results for Soils with High Organic Matter

2023 Year in Review and 2024 Preview

As the Cornell Vegetable Program reflects on 2023, we want to thank you for your partnership and continued support of our team and the work we do to address issues impacting the commercial vegetable industry in the western and central portion of NYS. Our 2023 Year in Review and 2024 Preview report highlights of some of the many research and outreach programs led by our team members over the last year plus a look ahead to some of our plans for 2024.
  • Use of Ground Barriers as a New Strategy for Swede Midge in Brassicas for Small Organic and Urban Farms
  • Cornell Vegetable Program Responds to Late Blight in 2023
  • Working Groups Help to Improve the Western NY Food System
  • Field Trials Completed to Test Lasers as a Bird Deterrent in Sweet Corn
  • Increased Monitoring of Western Bean Cutworm in Dry Beans
  • Sweet Potato Varieties Suitable for Western NY Production?