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Extending the Harvest Season with Fall Production

Robert Hadad, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

July 11, 2013

Extending the Harvest Season with Fall Production
Late season production starts in mid spring. For a successful crop, start with a detailed plan. Designate an area specific for late season production so that management can take place in one spot rather than all over the farm. This will make cultivation, pest management, using row cover, and harvesting more efficient to manage.

Sow extra because you never know if the fall will be a mild one or not. A few extra warm weeks in October, November and even December can mean crops have more time to mature, can go later into storage, or can be protected longer under cover.

Several of the seed companies have segments in their catalogs or even separate catalogs to order late season and over wintering crop varieties. Read their descriptions carefully. Go heavy with tried and true types and experiment with a few new ones to see how they work. Some catalogs are from areas of the country where winters are milder so take their descriptions and planting dates with a grain of salt. We need to have things going at a tough time between hot Augusts and Septembers to cold cloudy wet spells in October. With diminishing sunlight, every cloudy day is like losing several sunny days making reaching maturity that much harder.

Set up plantings into beds and after last cultivation, put up low tunnel or Quick tunnel hoops. This will save time later if an early frost is forecasted and you have to cover things in a hurry.  If you are using row cover, you probably still have it laying in the aisles next your early planted beds. Pull it out of there, dry it off, roll it up, and put it where you can get to it next fall. Put your sand bags set aside near the beds covered to protect them from the sun. Fill more to replace any old torn ones.

For kale, Swiss chard, cutting celery, and parsley, it might be a good strategy to get these crops started early, like now, so that you have large ready-to-pick plants going into the fall. Growth often slows down on later season plantings especially when the weather is cloudy. These are big plants that can take up room and if they are not ready to produce, they are costing you money.

A planting schedule chart arranged by crop is provided below. It includes days to maturity, harvest date range, seeding date, transplant date, key notes, and over-wintering information.

For more information or if you have any questions, please contact Robert Hadad, Cornell Vegetable Regional Specialist.


Planting Schedule Chart for Fall Production (pdf; 243KB)

more crops
Asparagus

Asparagus

Beets

Beets

Broccoli

Broccoli

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels Sprouts

Cabbage

Cabbage

Carrots

Carrots

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

Cucumbers

Cucumbers

Dry Beans

Dry Beans

Eggplant

Eggplant

Ethnic Vegetables

Ethnic Vegetables

Garlic

Garlic

Horseradish

Horseradish

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Leeks

Leeks

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Melons

Melons

Onions

Onions

Parsnips

Parsnips

Peas

Peas

Peppers

Peppers

Potatoes

Potatoes

Pumpkins / Gourds

Pumpkins / Gourds

Radishes

Radishes

Rhubarb

Rhubarb

Rutabaga

Rutabaga

Snap Beans

Snap Beans

Squash - Summer

Squash - Summer

Squash- Winter

Squash- Winter

Sweet Corn

Sweet Corn

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Turnips

Turnips

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Upcoming Events

Storage Crop Facility School: Large-Scale Vegetable (Potato and Cabbage)

December 1, 2020

Speakers from across the Northeast will be presenting on challenges and updates surrounding large-scale potato and cabbage storage. Join us for this FREE online event to hear about storage innovation and updating facilities, decreasing storage diseases, storage funding programs, and farm food safety considerations for storage facilities.

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Storage Crop Facility School: Smaller-Scale Mixed Vegetable Storage

December 8, 2020

Join us for this FREE online event to hear the latest information on smaller-scale storage and storage of mixed vegetables. Speakers from across the Northeast and Midwest will be presenting on cold storage construction, humidity and ventilation management, tactics for better storage of produce, decreasing diseases in storage, funding opportunities, and farm food safety considerations for storage facilities.

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2020 NYS Processing Vegetable Advisory Meetings

Event Offers DEC Credits

December 15, 2020 : Snap Bean Advisory

Processors and growers of snap beans are invited to this FREE online meeting to review the 2020 season and comment on pests and other issues that were encountered. Reports of the 2020 research projects funded by the New York Vegetable Research Association/Council will be given. A group discussion period will include the review of research priorities for the coming year. 0.75 DEC credits in categories 1a, 10, and 23 will be offered.

Event Offers DEC Credits

December 15, 2020 : Green Pea and Sweet Corn Advisory

Processors and growers of green peas and sweet corn are invited to this FREE online meeting to review the 2020 season and comment on pests and other issues that were encountered. Reports of the 2020 research projects funded by the New York Vegetable Research Association/Council will be given. A group discussion period will include the review of research priorities for the coming year. 1.0 DEC credits in categories 1a, 10, and 23 will be offered.

Event Offers DEC Credits

December 16, 2020 : Beet and Carrot Advisory Meeting

Processors and growers of beets and carrots are invited to this FREE online meeting to review the 2020 season and comment on pests and other issues that were encountered. Reports of the 2020 research projects funded by the New York Vegetable Research Association/Council will be given. A group discussion period will include the review of research priorities for the coming year. 1.0 DEC credits in categories 1a, 10, and 23 will be offered.

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